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Fellowship Announcements

 

Please see below announcements about current Fellowships:

Office of the Inspector General for the NYPD

Law Intern & Fellowship Program for Students and Recent Graduates

Spring 2017 (January through May)

Summer 2017 (May through August)


The Office of the Inspector General for the NYPD (OIG-NYPD) is an independent office charged with investigating, reviewing, studying, auditing, and making recommendations relating to the operations, policies, programs, and practices of the New York City Police Department, with the goal of enhancing the effectiveness of NYPD, increasing public safety, protecting civil liberties and civil rights, and increasing the public’s confidence in the police force. OIG-NYPD is independent of the NYPD and is part of the New York City Department of Investigation (DOI).  For more information, visit www.nyc.gov/html/oignypd

 

OIG-NYPD is seeking energetic law student Interns and/or post-graduate legal fellows to assist OIG-NYPD attorneys and investigators in a wide range of legal and investigative projects.  The positions offer an opportunity to work on cutting-edge issues of public concern in a, high-profile environment.  Interns/Fellows will examine legal topics relating to active reviews and investigations of NYPD policies and practices, research and draft legal documents, summarize pertinent case law and legislation, support OIG-NYPD operations, review investigative material, assist with inquiries received by OIG-NYPD, participate in internal staff meetings and external meetings with key stakeholders, and help develop strategies and policies.  The positions are unpaid.


The selected candidate should be enthusiastic about working in government and on police accountability, law enforcement, civil rights, and criminal justice issues.  Candidates should demonstrate good judgment, high ethical standards, strong analytical and writing skills, and a proactive attitude. All candidates are required to successfully complete a criminal background check. 

 

To apply, please submit a resume, letter of interest, and a short (5-10 page) legal writing sample via email or postal service to the address below. Writing samples that contain legal arguments and analysis are preferred over general research papers or legal journal articles/notes.  Applicants should specify if they are applying for a spring position (January to May) or summer position (May to August).

 

Asim Rehman

General Counsel

Office of Inspector General for the NYPD

NYC Department of Investigation

80 Maiden Lane

New York, NY  10038

OIGNYPDintern@oignypd.nyc.gov (Subject Line:  Law Internship/Fellowship)

 

Applicants participating in a formal internship, fellowship, or externship program through their law school should specify the duration of the program and the number of hours they will be available and/or required to work.  Candidates will be required to work a minimum of 15 hours per week.

 

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis and the posting will close once the position is filled.  Questions may be directed to the email address above. 

 
2017-2019 Aryeh Neier Fellowship Opportunity
Human Rights Watch / American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
Application Deadline: October 8, 2016 

The American Civil Liberties Union Foundation (“ACLU”) and Human Rights Watch (“HRW”) inviteapplications for the Aryeh Neier Fellowship. The fellow will work with both organizations on joint initiativesto strengthen respect for human rights in the United States.

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures,and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and the laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country. Whether it’s achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, ending mass incarceration, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability or national origin.

Human Rights Watch is an international human rights monitoring and advocacy organization known for its in-depth investigations, its incisive and timely reporting, its innovative and high-profile advocacy campaigns, and its success in changing the human rights-related policies and practices of influential governments and international institutions.

Human Rights Watch and the ACLU created the fellowship in 2002 with generous funding from the Open Society Institute to honor the legacy of Aryeh Neier. As executive director of the ACLU and then of Human Rights Watch, Aryeh Neier helped develop both organizations into powerful forces for justice and human rights.

A special committee from both organizations will select the fellow, who will begin the two-year fellowship in the fall of 2017. He or she will most likely be placed in the New York City offices of Human Rights Watch and the ACLU, spending a year at each; however, the fellow should be open to placement in the organizations’ offices in other locations in the US.

Responsibilities:

1. Monitor human rights developments;
2. Conduct field research in the United States;
3. Draft reports on human rights conditions;
4. Engage in advocacy aimed at publicizing and curtailing human rights violations;
5. Assist with the development of litigation strategies; and
6. Carry out other tasks as may be required.

Qualifications:
Education: A recent J.D. graduate of a US law school or have a J.D. degree granted by June 2017
Experience: Academic or work experience related to some aspect of the protection of human rights and
civil liberties in the United States
Related Skills and Knowledge:
1. Sit for the bar exam prior to commencing the fellowship in September 2017
2. Eligibility to practice law in the US during the second year of the fellowship
3. Exceptional analytical skills, and an ability to write and speak clearly and persuasively
4. Self-motivated with the ability to take initiative and follow through on projects to completion
5. Ability to work independently as well as within a team
6. Proficiency in one language in addition to English is preferred
7. A demonstrated commitment to human rights and justice

Salary: The fellow will receive $55,000 in the first year, with a salary increase in the second year.

How to Apply: Please apply immediately or by 11:59 PM ET on October 8, 2016 by emailing, in a single submission (preferably as one PDF file), a cover letter, resume, two letters of recommendation, a brief writing sample unedited by others (no legal briefs, please), and an official law school transcript to usprog_jobs@hrw.org. Please use “Aryeh Neier Fellowship 2017” as the subject of your email.

Only complete applications will be reviewed and only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.
Applicants must be available for interviews in New York from early November to mid-December 2016. Please see http://www.hrw.org/about/fellowships for more information.

This job description provides a general but not comprehensive list of the essential responsibilities and qualifications required. It does not represent a contract of employment. The ACLU/HRW reserves the right to change the job description and/or posting at any time without advance notice. Human Rights Watch and the ACLU are equal opportunity employers that value a diverse and inclusive culture and encourage applications from all qualified individuals including women, people of color, persons with disabilities and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The ACLU comprises two separate corporate entities, the American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU Foundation. Both the American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU Foundation are national organizations with the same overall mission and share office space and employees. The ACLU has two separate corporate entities in order to do a broad range of work to protect civil liberties. This job posting refers collectively to the two organizations under the name "ACLU".

International Fellowships in Human Rights
 NOTICE 2017 JD GRADUATES
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
DEADLINE TO APPLY: October 8, 2016
 
 

For recent graduates of law schools or graduate programs in journalism, international relations, area studies, or other relevant disciplines from universities worldwide.

Unrestricted Fellowships

 

Alan R. and Barbara D. Finberg Fellowship - Established in memory of Alan R. and Barbara D. Finberg, early supporters of Human Rights Watch (“HRW”), this fellowship is open to recent graduates (at the Master's level) in the fields of law, journalism, international relations, or other relevant studies. Graduates with LL.B. degrees or advanced degrees in other relevant disciplines may also be considered.

 

Restricted Fellowships

 

NYU School of Law Fellowship at HRW - This fellowship is open to 2017 J.D. graduates of New York University School of Law and recent J.D. graduates who would begin the fellowship immediately upon completion of a judicial clerkship.

 

Leonard H. Sandler Fellowship - Established in memory of Judge Leonard H. Sandler, a 1950 Columbia Law graduate with a lifelong commitment to civil rights and liberties, this fellowship is open to recent J.D. graduates of Columbia Law School only.

 

JOB DESCRIPTION:

Fellows typically work full-time for one year in Human Rights Watch’s New York or Washington, D.C. office. In some instances other locations may be considered. The Fellowships begin in September 2017.

Fellows monitor human rights developments in various countries, conduct on-site investigations, draft reports on human rights conditions, and engage in advocacy and media outreach aimed at publicizing and curtailing human rights violations.

 

Past fellows have conducted research and advocacy on numerous different issues in countries all over the world. Recent examples include projects on: police corruption and access to justice in Liberia; accessibility for people with disabilities in Russia; youth in solitary confinement in US prisons; hazardous child labor in artisanal gold mining in Tanzania; police abuse of gay men in Kyrgyzstan.

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

 

Education: For specific education requirements, please see the postings attached.

 

Experience: Prior research experience, including experience conducting interviews, ideally in the context of human rights research, is required.

 

Related Skills and Knowledge

  1. Demonstrated strong background in international human rights and commitment to building a career in human rights are required.
  2. Excellent oral and written communications skills in English are required.
  3. Proficiency in one language in addition to English is strongly desired as is familiarity with countries or regions where serious human rights violations occur.
  4. Self-motivation, ability to multi-task effectively, including having good planning and organizing skills and ability to work under pressure are required.
  5. Strong initiative and follow-through, exceptional analytical skills, the capacity to think creatively and strategically, excellent editing skills, perseverance and flexibility while maintaining HRW’s high methodological standards are required.
  6. Strong interpersonal skills in order to work collaboratively within HRW, as well as with external partners, are required.
  7. Ability to make sound decisions consistent with functions is required.

Salary and Benefits: The salary for 2017-2018 fellows is US $55,000, plus excellent employer-paid benefits. HRW will pay reasonable relocation expenses and will assist employees in obtaining necessary work authorization, if required; citizens of all nationalities are encouraged to apply.

 

Application Deadline: Please apply immediately or by 11:59 PM ET on October 8, 2016 by visiting our online job portal at https://careers.hrw.org/. No phone calls, please. Only complete applications will be reviewed and only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.  Please note that shortlisted candidates may be contacted at a later stage to submit the following: two letters of recommendation and an official law or graduate school transcript.

 

Applicants must be available for interviews in New York from late November to mid-December 2016. Please direct inquiries, including technical difficulties with your application submission, to fellowship@hrw.org. Due to the large response, application submissions via email will not be accepted and inquiries regarding the status of applications will go unanswered. 

 

Human Rights Watch is an equal opportunity employer that does not discriminate in its hiring practices and, in order to build the strongest possible workforce, actively seeks a diverse applicant pool.

 

Human Rights Watch is an international human rights monitoring and advocacy organization known for its in-depth investigations, its incisive and timely reporting, its innovative and high-profile advocacy campaigns, and its success in changing the human rights-related policies and practices of influential governments and international institutions.

Marvin M. Karpatkin Fellowship Fall 2017
 NOTICE TO THIRD-YEAR LAW STUDENTS AND RECENT GRADUATES
American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
Racial Justice Program, NY
DEADLINE TO APPLY: October 1, 2016

The Racial Justice Program of the ACLU’s national office in New York City invites applications for the Marvin M. Karpatkin Fellowship, which will begin in September 2017 and last for one year.

OVERVIEW

The Fellowship was established by the ACLU Board of Directors in memory of Marvin M. Karpatkin, the late General Counsel of the American Civil Liberties Union, who died in January 1975, at the age of 48.  Mr. Karpatkin was one of the ACLU's most active attorneys during the 1960s and early 1970s.  He left his special mark in the areas of selective service and military law.  His interest in those areas grew out of his own strong opposition to the Vietnam War and his desire to help those who, younger than himself, were faced with performing military service in a war they would not support.

Racial Justice Program (RJP) attorneys and staff work to challenge racial discrimination and related issues that have a disparate impact on communities of color, particularly in the areas of criminal justice, economic justice and education In the area of criminal justice, we are dedicated to reducing the unwarranted and disproportionate targeting and incarceration of people of color.  In the area of education, we seek to ensure that all children have access to quality education, regardless of race or ethnicity and seek to end the school-to-prison pipeline that funnels children of color out of the education system into the criminal and juvenile justice systems. We have filed civil challenges to the practice of jailing indigent persons because of their inability to pay court fines and are exploring other practices which have the effect of criminalizing poverty. We have also taken steps to challenge racial profiling and are working to counteract the negative effects of discrimination in mortgage lending on communities of color.

ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

The Karpatkin Fellow functions as part of the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program’s litigation team. Responsibilities will include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Provide legal research and analysis and develop theories to support new litigation projects.
  • Draft pleadings, affidavits, motions, and briefs.
  • Interview witnesses and potential plaintiffs.
  • Participate in discovery and trial practice.
  • Provide support and assistance to ACLU affiliates and cooperating attorneys.
  • Engage in public speaking and attend meetings and/or conferences as needed.
  • Supervise student interns. 

EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATIONS

  • J.D. degree or expectation of receiving one by the Spring of 2017. 
  • A demonstrated ability to conduct complex legal analysis and fact-finding.
  • Excellent research, writing and verbal communication skills.
  • Self-starter with excellent interpersonal skills.
  • Proven ability to work independently as well as within a team.
  • Excellent computer skills including knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Demonstrated commitment to public interest law.
  • Commitment to the mission and goals of the ACLU. 

 COMPENSATION

The ACLU offers a generous and comprehensive compensation and benefits package, commensurate with experience and within parameters of the ACLU compensation scale.

HOW TO APPLY
Applicants should send a cover letter, resume, two letters of recommendation and at least one legal writing sample to:hrjobs@aclu.org - reference [LGLF-45] in subject line.

OCA Civil Rights Fellowship 2016-2017 

DEADLINE TO APPLY: June 15, 2016

OCA - Asian Pacific American Advocates, a national membership-driven organization of community advocates dedicated to advancing the political, social, and economic well-being of Asian Pacific Americans (APA), is seeking qualified candidates for the OCA Civil Rights Fellowship.  

The OCA Civil Rights Fellowship is a national advocacy fellowship based at the OCA National Center in Washington DC, which mobilizes OCA's chapter networks across the country to support the building of individual and community capacity for the advancement of civil rights for Asian Pacific Americans.

The key components of this program include but are not limited to: 

Public Policy
Advocacy on AAPI Issues
JACL/OCA Leadership Summit

The fellow will build policy and advocacy expertise through hands on experience with influential and experienced staff, colleagues, and organizational partners in the nation's capital. During the one-year term, the OCA Civil Rights Fellow works to address some of the most pressing issues that challenge the community today.

Finalists will be contacted by the end of June for an interview. 

Responsibilities: Work collaboratively and independently to provide hands-on project management through all phases of project development process:  Research, planning (development of time-lines, work plans, and budget), implementation, tracking, and evaluation.Monitor and analyze relevant activity on Capitol Hill, in the executive branch, and in peer organizations at the national level.Supervise interns as assigned according to existing organizational policies and procedures as well as human resource best-practices.When appropriate, interact with the public including the media-able to direct inquiries to the appropriate organizational spokespersons.Serve as the primary staff liaison and support to the advisory groups for each of the projects/programs assigned.

Candidate Requisites: At minimum, undergraduate degree in political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, law, public administration, or a related field, OR equivalent work experience.Demonstrated ability to write in an accurate, concise, and audience appropriate manner on complex public policy issues. Interest and commitment to Asian Pacific American advocacy issues.Proven history of developing and maintaining positive organizational relationships with community based organizations, government agencies, and corporations through the use of communication media.Proven ability to manage multiple projects and deadlines simultaneously.Capacity to maintain professional demeanor while working under significant pressure.Capacity to work in a fast paced and flexible environment.High level of personal energy.Willingness to work nights/weekends and to travel periodically as required

Preferred Skills: Strong cross-sectional analysis around civil rights issues related to education, immigration, race relations, access to institutional and non-institutional resources, and hate crimes within the framework of these issues impacting Asian Pacific American (APA) communities. History of demonstrated experience in leading community based advocacy efforts within culturally diverse communities.Experience in event planning and programming which requires management of logistics-especially for projects such as training, town halls, press conferences, panel discussions, etc.Experience with presentation, facilitation and training to small as well as large groups.

Location and Duration: To be based in Washington, DC at the OCA National Center for 12 Months, starting in July 2016. The fellow must be able to relocate for this opportunity after acceptance-no relocation costs are included in the fellowship.
Compensation
$35,000 per year, plus health and retirement benefits (the Fellow may elect to enroll in dental benefits at their expense), and two weeks of vacation.

Application: Interested individuals should apply online below. Application requirements include the following:

CV or Resume
Cover Letter
Two (2) Professional References and two (2) Personal References
Two (2) essays (Please see the essay prompts included in this packet)

Essays:
Please answer the following questions in 500 words or less: 1) How does your ethnic background inform your interest in advocating for the Asian Pacific American community? 2) What are some strategies for engaging with communities that you are not familiar with? 3) Identify an issue in the AAPI community and develop a national advocacy plan around this issue.

The completed packet must be submitted electronically online.The completed packet must be received at the OCA National Office by 6:00 PM ETJune 15, 2016.All applications submitted by the due date will be issued an e-mail confirmation verifying receipt.

Questions:For additional questions, comments, or concerns, please contact kmoua@ocanational.org or call 202.223.5500. ext. 115

OCA - Asian Pacific American Advocates is an equal opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate in its selection and employment practices. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, political affiliation, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, age, or other legally protected characteristics.

Lambda Legal Fair Courts Project Fellowship

Lambda Legal invites recent and prospective law graduates to apply for a two-year Fair Courts Project Fellowship in its Education and Public Affairs Department. The Fair Courts Project Fellowship is a paid, full-time, two-year legal fellowship.

Lambda Legal is a national, nonprofit organization committed to achieving full recognition of the civil rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (“LGBT”) people and those with HIV through impact litigation, education, and public policy work. Founded in 1973 and headquartered in New York City, Lambda Legal has regional offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta and Dallas. Lambda Legal has been involved in numerous landmark United States and state Supreme Court cases, including Obergefell v. Hodges, Lawrence v. Texas, Romer v. Evans, Boy Scouts of America v. Dale, Bragdon v. Abbott, Glenn v. Brumby, In re Marriage Cases, Varnum v. Brien, Benitez v.  North Coast Women’s Care Medical Group, Fields v. Smith and Brandon v. County of Richardson. For more information about Lambda Legal, visit www.lambdalegal.org

The Education and Public Affairs (EPA) Department leads the community education, communications and marketing efforts of the organization. The goals of the EPA Department are to influence the national debate, create public support for Lambda Legal’s impact litigation and for laws that lead to equality for LGBT people and people living with HIV, and increase support for the organization. EPA reports and explains the purpose and results of our work, teaches people about their rights under the law, and amplifies the voices of our experts and of affected communities through a variety of media and high-impact education campaigns. EPA also strengthens Lambda Legal’s work by forging strategic partnerships with allies, coalitions and policy makers.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

The Fair Courts Project works to advance an independent, diverse and well-respected judiciary that upholds the constitutional and legal rights of LGBT people and those with HIV, while ensuring equal access to justice for everyone.

The Fair Courts Fellowship will be a unique opportunity for a recent law school graduate to gain valuable and diverse experience in: 1.) training and education for the judiciary; 2.) fair courts advocacy and litigation; and 3.) movement building to expand and diversify the fair courts field. 

The Fair Courts Fellow will:

  • Build, train and manage a national network of trainers to expand our anti-bias and cultural competency trainings to court systems in several states.
  • Collaborate with the Fair Courts Litigation Task Force to explore litigation opportunities to advance judicial independence and other critical fair courts issues.
  • Assist callers to Lambda Legal’s Help Desk who encountered discrimination in the courts.
  • Engage in strategic advocacy under the guidance of the Fair Courts Project Director to advance laws and policies related to judicial diversity, judicial selection methods and safeguarding the courts from the harmful influences of money and politics.
  • Expand partnerships with racial justice, immigrant rights, reproductive justice, disability rights, environmental justice and other advocacy groups to develop community education events and educational tools around shared interests in fair courts.
  • Plan and execute substantive events, workshops and meetings on fair courts issues.
  • Represent the Fair Courts Project in partnerships and coalition work.
  • Assist the Fair Courts Project Director with programmatic, development and administrative work, as well as recruitment and supervision of project interns.

Qualifications:

Working at Lambda Legal requires a demonstrated awareness of and commitment to the concerns of the communities Lambda Legal represents. All applicants must have a strong interest in LGBT and HIV-related rights, a passion for issue advocacy, a high level of independence and initiative, strong speaking and writing ability, creativity, a willingness to travel, good judgment, and an enthusiasm for working with others.

Salary:

The salary for the Fellowship is commensurate with experience within the guidelines of Lambda Legal scale. Excellent employer-paid benefits package is provided including medical, dental, life and long-term disability insurance and generous employer contribution to retirement account. Generous vacation.

Application:

Send resume and cover letter to Eric Lesh, Fair Courts Project Director, at elesh@lambdalegal.org. Include the words, “Fair Courts Project Fellow” in the subject line of your email.

No calls please. Due to the high volume of applications, Lambda Legal will not accept phone calls about the position and does not notify applicants of status except when an interview is granted.

Lambda Legal is committed to further building and maintaining a staff that reflects the full range of LGBT, HIV and allied communities, and is an equal opportunity employer. People of color, transgender and gender-nonconforming people, women, people with abilities in multiple languages, immigrants, and people living with disabilities, including HIV, are encouraged to apply.

 
Community Development Project Seeks 2016 Legal Fellowship Candidates 

The Community Development Project of the Urban Justice Center announces the opportunity to apply for sponsorship for post-graduate legal fellowships starting in the fall of 2017 (applications due fall 2016).

The Community Development Project is seeking prospective third-year law students and recent law graduates currently clerking or with clerkships beginning in the fall to sponsor for public interest law fellowships offered by the Skadden Fellowship Foundation, Equal Justice Works, Kirkland & Ellis New York City Public Service Fellowship Program, and other similar programs. We are looking for fellowship applicants interested in providing legal services in the areas of consumer justice, workers’ rights, and/or the intersection between workers’ rights and immigration law.

The Community Development Project strengthens the impact of grassroots organizations in New York City’s low-income and other excluded communities. We partner with community organizations to win legal cases, publish community-driven research reports, assist with the formation of new organizations and cooperatives, and provide technical and transactional assistance in support of their work towards social justice. Currently our work with grassroots groups includes affordable housing, workers’ rights, consumer economic justice, land use, zoning, transactional legal services, and worker cooperatives. Please read an overview of our work for more information.
Qualifications:
Skadden Fellowship Foundation, Equal Justice Works, and other similar organizations provide fellowships to graduating law students or outgoing judicial clerks who seek to begin a career in a public interest law office like the Community Development Project, which sponsors the fellowship candidate. Applicants with experience working with, in, or on behalf of community-based organizations are strongly encouraged to apply. Applicants must either be admitted to the New York Bar, or sitting for the New York Bar not later than July 2017. Applicants of color and applicants with foreign language abilities, particularly Spanish, East Asian and South Asian languages, are also encouraged to apply.
Application Instructions:
Interested applicants who are eligible for the fellowships described above (i.e., prospective third-year law students, recent law graduates currently clerking or those with clerkships beginning in the fall), should send a resume and cover letter including a brief description of their interest in being considered for sponsorship by the Community Development Project as well as information about the type of fellowship project they are considering. Applicants should show a basic familiarity with the fellowship opportunities available and the requirements of each.

Please note: this is not a job posting. General application materials will not be considered. Send the requested documents by e-mail with the words "Fellowships 2016" in the subject line to cdpfellowships@urbanjustice.org. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis through 5 p.m. EST on July 1, 2016. Due to our rolling deadline, early applications are encouraged.

Contact Information: cdpfellowships@urbanjustice.org, Community Development Project, Urban Justice Center, 123 William Street, 16th Floor, New York, NY, 10038, Attn: Fellowships.
The Community Development Project is an equal opportunity employer. CDP encourages applications from people with diverse backgrounds, including women, people of color, immigrants, people with disabilities, LGBTQ people, people from low-income backgrounds, and people with personal experience with the criminal justice system. We strongly encourage applications from people with lived experiences in the communities we serve. 

Empire State Fellows Program

Application Deadline Extended to April 22, 2016

The Empire State Fellows Program is a full-time leadership training program that will prepare the next generation of talented professionals for careers as New York State policy-makers. The incoming class of Empire State Fellows will serve from September 2016 to September 2018, and receive an annual salary commensurate with experience, not to exceed $72,765, plus a generous benefits package. At the end of the fellowship, a performance review process will identify Empire State Fellows that will be given the opportunity to continue to serve as leaders in New York State government after completing the program.

Engagement in the work of New York State government lies at the heart of the Empire State Fellows Program. Governor Cuomo will appoint each Empire State Fellow to work directly with a Commissioner, Deputy Commissioner, or other high-level policy maker. Each Empire Fellow will work in the Executive Chamber or at a state office or agency, such as the Empire State Development Corporation, the Department of State, the Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Department of Labor, or the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services. (For a full list of New York State executive agencies see http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/ils/nyserver.html.) Work assignments offer Fellows unparalleled experience collaborating with senior officials and participating in the policy-making process.

While taking part in the work of government, Empire Fellows will participate in educational and professional development programs that will help them to serve as effective and ethical government leaders. The educational component of the Empire State Fellows Program kicks-off with a one-week course in September 2016. Educational coursework will continue on a semi-monthly basis. Meanwhile, professional development activities, including a breakfast presentation series and mentoring by Cabinet members and other government leaders, will enhance Empire Fellows’ collaboration with policy-makers.

Applications for the 2016-2018 Empire State Fellows Class are now open. The Empire State Fellows Program is designed to attract talented professionals with demonstrated leadership potential who want to refocus their careers on public service. Candidates will be selected on the basis of their academic and professional experience, demonstrated leadership potential, commitment to public service, communication skills, and creativity.

Applicants should possess the following qualifications:

Professionalism:

• Creativity and strong leadership potential 

• Excellent analytical and evaluative skills

• Strong interpersonal and communication skills

• Excellent organizational skills, efficiency and flexibility

• Ability to establish priorities, plan, coordinate and monitor work

• Ability to work independently while also collaborating with a team

• Ability to identify issues, recognize best practices, formulate options and make recommendations

Experience:

• A minimum of three (3) years of full-time professional experience 

• Demonstrated leadership potential

• Managerial experience is a plus

• Applicants may come from all professional backgrounds

Education:

• An advanced university degree (master's degree, JD, PhD or equivalent) is desirable, but a candidate   with only a Bachelor’s degree may be considered if he/she has substantial professional experience

• Applicants may come from all academic disciplines

Additional requirements:

• Candidates must be United States Citizens 

• Candidates must be available to work in Albany, New York throughout the two-year program (this is   NOT negotiable)

• Current New York State executive and legislative branch employees are ineligible for the Empire State   Fellows Program

To Apply:

Applications for the 2016-2018 Empire State Fellows Class are now open. All application documents must be emailed to Fellows@exec.ny.gov as Microsoft Word or PDF attachments. A complete application will include:

1. Cover letter

2. Professional Resume or CV

3. Personal statement explaining your interest in the Empire State Fellows Program and why you should

    be selected (no more than two pages)

4. Two letters of recommendation (Letters of recommendation should be sent directly from the 

     recommender as PDF or Microsoft Word attachments to an email to Fellows@exec.ny.gov with the 

     applicant’s full name in the subject line.)

The application should consist of three emails: (1) an email from the applicant attaching the cover letter, resume, and personal statement in PDF or Microsoft Word format, (2) an email from recommender #1 attaching his/her recommendation letter in PDF or Microsoft Word format, and (3) an email from recommender #2 attaching his/her recommendation letter in PDF or Microsoft Word format. All three emails must be received before 11:59 p.m. on Monday, April 22, 2016. All three emails should have the applicant’s full name in the subject line. 

Late or incomplete applications will not be accepted.


Appellate Litigation Fellowship

Division of Appeals and Opinions

Appellate Litigation Fellowship - College Graduate - New York City

Reference No. A&O_FEL_NYC_6012

The Office of the New York State Attorney General's Division of Appeals and Opinions is offering a two-year fellowship in government appellate litigation in its New York City Office. One fellowship is available. The Fellowship is a compensated, full-time position for a college graduate who is considering whether to pursue a career in law. A commitment through June 2018 is required.

The Division of Appeals and Opinions handles appeals by and against the State of New York in all state and federal appellate courts. Cases cover a wide range of issues, including constitutional and statutory public-law issues, employment, civil rights, torts, and agency decision making. We are seeking a bright, dynamic, hard-working and motivated individual committed to public service. The selected Fellow will work closely with attorneys to prepare court documents and appellate records; finalize briefs, including highly detailed proofreading and cite-checking; organize case files; and provide relevant legal and office support. Fellows might also work on special projects for the Division and have the opportunity to draft legal documents.

Applicants must have a BA or BS degree. Excellent oral and written communication skills, hyper-attention to detail, organizational skills, and the ability to handle multiple tasks under pressure are also required. Experience in a legal setting is a plus, but not required as Fellows will receive extensive training. This Fellowship is also open to law school students with at least two (2) full years remaining in an evening law school program.

Candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

The OAG is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to workplace diversity.

Review of applications begins immediately and will continue on a rolling basis. Applications must be received no later than Monday, April 4, 2016 to ensure consideration. The position requires an in-person interview at the New York City office. The Office does not pay travel, transportation, or relocation expenses.

HOW TO APPLY

Applications are being received online. To apply, please visit our website by clicking here. Applicants must be prepared to submit a complete application consisting of the following:

Applicants must be prepared to submit a complete application consisting of the following:

 

  • Cover Letter (Please address to Sandra Jefferson Grannum, Esq., Bureau Chief, Legal Recruitment) 
  • Resume 
  • Writing Sample 
  • List of three (3) references with contact information and email addresses 
  • Transcript
Please note: Failure to submit a complete application will delay the consideration of your application.

 

If you have questions about a position with the OAG, the application process or need assistance with submitting your application, please contact the Legal Recruitment Bureau via email at recruitment@ag.ny.gov or phone at 212-416- 8080.

For more information about the OAG, please visit our website: www.ag.ny.gov


2016-18 PUBLIC INTEREST FELLOWSHIP

WASHINGTON, D.C. or OAKLAND, CA

Public Justice, a national public interest law firm dedicated to pursuing high impact lawsuits to combat social and economic injustice, protect the Earth’s sustainability, and challenge predatory corporate conduct and government abuses, seeks to hire a law school graduate to serve as a Fellow for two years in either its Washington, D.C. headquarters or its Oakland, California office.  The Fellow will help develop and litigate Public Justice’s cases.  The position will start in the fall of 2016.Public Justice is involved in a broader range of high-impact, cutting-edge litigation than any other public interest firm in the nation.  Our lawsuits fight for consumers’ and victims’ rights, the environment, civil rights and civil liberties, public health and safety, workers’ rights, government and corporate accountability, and the protection of the poor and powerless.  Our Access to Justice Campaign works to keep the courthouse doors open for all—by battling federal preemption, unnecessary court secrecy, class action bans and abuses, unfair mandatory arbitration, and other efforts to deprive people of their day in court.The Fellow will work collaboratively with Public Justice’s staff attorneys, outside lawyers who support Public Justice’s work, and other public interest groups in order to develop and bring precedent-setting and socially significant litigation.  He or she may also help to develop materials designed to educate members of the public and the bar about Public Justice’s cases and the issues they represent. 

REQUIREMENTS:                    
  • Superb analytical, legal research, legal writing, and speaking skills                 
  • Preference given to individuals with at least two years of litigation experience                    
  • Ability to juggle multiple tasks at a time and work in a fast-paced environment                    
  • Self-motivation and proven ability to work independently
  • Ability to work well with others and diverse groups            
  • Excellent attention to detail and commitment to follow-through         
  • Positive attitude and can-do personality
  • Strong organizational skills  
  • Willingness to travel for several weeks per year
  • Healthy sense of outrage and desire to change the world for the better 
Salary is $53,000 per year.  Excellent benefits.  Public Justice is an equal opportunity employer with a non-smoking environment.  Diversity valued.  Applications invited regardless of race, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, age, or disability.  Your application should consist of two electronic files: (1) your cover letter, resume, transcript, and references in a single .pdf file; and (2) a writing sample exhibiting persuasive legal writing in another .pdf file.  Please send both files to lawfellow@publicjustice.net.  The deadline for applications is March 31, 2016
 
For more information, please visit our website at www.publicjustice.net.
 
National Headquarters: 1825 K Street NW Suite 200 Washington, D.C.  20006
West Coast Office: 555 Twelfth Street, Suite 1230  Oakland, CA  94607


Civil Rights Bureau Fellowship – Volunteer Assistant Attorney General 

Division of Social Justice

Civil Rights Bureau Fellowship – Volunteer Assistant Attorney General

Reference No. CRI_NYC_FEL

The Office of the New York State Attorney General’s Civil Rights Bureau in New York City is offering a one (1) year law graduate fellowship focusing on the enforcement of civil rights law. Candidates with a background in civil rights are strongly encouraged to apply. The Civil Rights Bureau Fellowship is uncompensated. Candidates with law school public interest fellowships, deferred law firm associates, as well as those who may not have outside funding, are encouraged to apply.

 

The Bureau enforces laws that protect all New Yorkers from discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, military status, source of income or disability. Using federal, state, and local civil rights laws, such as the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Fair Housing Act, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Americans with Disabilities Act and other landmark laws, the Bureau investigates and prosecutes discrimination in a variety of areas. Recent cases handled by the Bureau have helped to promote voting rights, access to fair housing and fair lending opportunities, access to equal employment and educational opportunities and equal access for individuals with disabilities. In addition, the Bureau has worked to combat immigration services fraud, discrimination and harassment in the workplace and police misconduct. The Bureau seeks to lift barriers faced by persons based on sexual orientation, language ability and criminal conviction status. The Bureau’s docket reflects its commitment to combating discrimination and its effects, ensuring equality of opportunity and promoting inclusion.

 

Fellow(s) will have the opportunity to work with experienced attorneys within the Bureau to gain hands-on legal experience assisting with all aspects of the Bureau’s work including investigations, litigation, public education and community outreach. Fellow(s) will be designated as Volunteer Assistant Attorney General.

 

We are seeking candidates who have excellent legal writing and analytical skills as well as organizational skills. Fluency in other languages is a plus, but not required. Strong candidates will be able to demonstrate a commitment to civil rights and public service.

 

Applicants must (1) be admitted to the New York State bar; (2) be awaiting admission to the New York State bar; (3) be awaiting New York State bar exam results; or (4) be preparing to sit for the next scheduled New York State bar exam. In addition, the Public Officers Law requires that attorneys in the Office be citizens of the United States and reside in (or intend to soon become a resident of) New York State. Candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Candidates from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to apply. The Office is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to workplace diversity.

 

Applications are being received online. To apply, please go to our website: http://www.ag.ny.gov/job-postings. Applicants must be prepared to submit a complete application packet consisting of a cover letter (include Reference No. CRI_NYC_FEL), resume, most recent law school transcript (unofficial is acceptable), writing sample, and a list of three (3) references with contact information. You may address your cover letter to Sandra Jefferson Grannum, Esq., Bureau Chief, Legal Recruitment Bureau, Office of the New York State Attorney General, 120 Broadway, New York, NY 10271. Please note: Failure to submit a complete application will delay the consideration of your application.

 

For more information about the application process or assistance with submitting your application, please contact the Legal Recruitment Bureau via email at recruitment@ag.ny.gov or phone at 212-416-8080. 


 

2016 Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellowship
Instructions & Application for Law Students and Host Organizations
Deadline: February 5, 2016

 

The Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellowship will provide a $6000 scholarship for one law student to gain meaningful legal experience at a public interest host organization. The Fellowship is open to all rising 1L and 2L law students at any qualified host organization in the United States.

 

The objective of the program is to:

  • Perpetuate the memory of Fred T. Korematsu’s impact on civil rights arising from his principled opposition to the Japanese American incarceration during WWII;
  • Undertake projects that further the cause of civil rights, whether in the United States or elsewhere;
  • Provide work experiences for law students that prepares them for careers in furtherance of civil rights;
  • To have a lasting impact on the security of civil rights; and
  • Inspire future lawyers to aspire to ensure that civil rights are accorded to all.

Overview

Fred T. Korematsu was a national civil rights hero. In 1942, at the age of 23, he refused to go to the government’s incarceration camps for Japanese Americans. After he was arrested and convicted of defying the government’s order, he appealed his case all the way to the Supreme Court. In 1944, the Supreme Court ruled against him, arguing that the incarceration was justified due to military necessity.

 

In 1983, Prof. Peter Irons, a legal historian, together with researcher Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga, discovered key documents that government intelligence agencies had hidden from the Supreme Court in 1944. The documents consistently showed that Japanese Americans had committed no acts of treason to justify mass incarceration. With this new evidence, a pro-bono coram nobis legal team re-opened Korematsu’s 40-year-old case on the basis of government misconduct. On November 10, 1983, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned in a federal court in San Francisco. It was a pivotal moment in civil rights history.

 

Korematsu remained an activist throughout his life. In 1998, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, from President Bill Clinton. In 2010, the state of California passed the Fred Korematsu Day bill, making January 30 the first day in the US named after an Asian American. Korematsu’s growing legacy continues to inspire people of all backgrounds and demonstrates the importance of speaking up to fight injustice.

 

Established by a generous gift from Parkin Lee and The Rockefeller Group, the NAPABA Law Foundation in partnership with the Fred T. Korematsu Institute have launched the Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellowship program. The Fellowship is administered through the NAPABA Law Foundation, which is a charitable organization that awards fellowships, scholarships, runs educational programs and the Thomas Tang National Moot Court Competition.

 

Fellowship Candidate and Host Eligibility/Criteria

 

  • Candidates must be rising 1L or 2L law student. Candidates should have a history of civil rights activism, interest in pursuing a civil rights career, strong academics and, like Fred T. Korematsu, strength of character and moral commitment.
  • Candidates must identify a public interest Host Organization that will provide him/her with a summer position if a Fellowship is received. Candidates that have already accepted a summer position at a Host Organization are eligible to apply.
  • Host Organizations are public interest organizations that agree to host the Fred T. Korematsu Fellow for 10 weeks during Summer 2016. They must also provide him/her with supervision, a workspace, and the materials that he/she will need to complete their project.
  • Together with his/her Host Organization, the Candidate and Host Organization must create a fellowship project proposal consistent with the objectives of the Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellowship program.  The proposal should identify a specific project that can be undertaken over the course of the summer fellowship that would support individual civil rights, in the United States or elsewhere.  The Selection Committee will be open-minded with respect to the types of issues addressed, and the type of work to be undertaken, as long as the focus is on civil rights.  Project proposal shall not exceed two pages.
  • Candidates must submit a statement outlining their interest in becoming a Fred T. Korematsu Fellow. Statements shall not exceed two pages.

Parameters

 

  • The Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellow will receive a $6000 scholarship, disbursed in two equal payments. The first payment of $3000 will occur at the completion of 5 weeks; the second payment will be disbursed upon the completion of the proposed project via written report at the conclusion of the 10-week fellowship.
  • The selected Fellow shall work at the host organization for a minimum of 40 hours a week for 10 weeks during Summer 2016. The Fellow shall be identified as the "Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellow” at the Host Organization.
  • A representative from NAPABA Law Foundation will check-in with the Fred T. Korematsu Fellow on a regular basis to monitor progress and provide assistance as necessary.

Time Frame

 

February 5, 2016

Application deadline

February 15 – March 4, 2016

Candidate interviews

On or about March 18, 2016

Fred T. Korematsu Fellowship chosen

Summer 2016 (10 weeks)

Fellowship begins at host organization

 

 

PALS 2016 Summer Civil Rights Fellowship

The application period for the PALS Civil Rights Fellowship Program begins

December 1, 2015 and will conclude on Sunday, December 27, 2015.

 

To learn more about this amazing fellowship please visit our SITE for the full description and application.

Applications will be reviewed and decided on a rolling basis,
students are encouraged to apply early.

This program has been designed to provide deserving law students of color, that are committed to pursuing a career in public interest, with a unique summer opportunity to work at one of three premier civil rights organizations:

Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund

LatinoJustice PRLDEF

NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc.

 

 

Through its generous donors, PALS aims to support law students of color that are interested in becoming part of the next generation of civil rights attorneys by enabling them to have an invaluable summer professional experience.

Fellowship Sponsors:

PALS provides each Fellow a summer stipend of $5,000. These stipends are made possible through the generosity of:

Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP

Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP

Sidley Austin LLP

Should you have any questions regarding the PALS Fellowship, please email the Executive Director of PALS, Paula Brown Donaldson, Esq. at executivedirector@palsprogram. org.

 

 

2016 AAA Higginbotham Fellows Program Applications Now Being Accepted

 

The American Arbitration Association (AAA) is now accepting applications for the 2016 AAA Higginbotham Fellows Program. The training component of the Program will be hosted in New York during the week of May 1, 2016 in order to coincide with the AAA's Annual Meeting. During the Program, Fellows will engage with leading ADR practitioners for an intensive week of training, seminars, and networking events. Interested candidates should visitwww.adr.org/diversity to download a copy of the Program Guidelines and Application or to apply online. Applications should be received no later than January 22, 2016.

The American Arbitration Association established the AAA Higginbotham Fellows Program in 2009 in order to provide training, mentorship and networking opportunities to up and coming diverse alternative dispute resolution professionals. The AAA Higginbotham Fellows Program is a one-year program designed to offer the full breadth of the AAA resources. Now entering its eighth year, the AAA Higginbotham Fellows Program has inducted 106 Fellows with 16 Fellows successfully advancing to the AAA Panel.

Click here for more information.


OATH Legal Fellowship Program Spring 2016
 
 
New York City’s Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings ("OATH”) provides a neutral forum for conducting fair and timely administrative hearings for City agencies, boards, and commissions.
 
 
ABOUT OATH
 

OATH was established in 1979 to professionalize the administrative trial and hearing system serving New York City government, and currently conducts about 300,000 hearings annually. OATH oversees:

 

  • Trials Division - hears a variety of matters, including human rights, discrimination and civil service disciplinary cases, car seizures, license revocations and complex contractual disputes
  • Hearings Division - currently adjudicates violations issued by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene concerning allegations affecting the City’s Health Code and public health laws
  • Environmental Control Board - oversees cases concerning quality of life and the environment
  • Taxi and Limousine Hearings - adjudicates summonses for violations of TLC rules and regulations issued to vehicles and drivers licensed by the Taxi & Limousine Commission

OATH provides administrative law judge training through its Administrative Judicial Training Institute and mediation services through the Center for Creative Conflict Resolution.

 

ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP
 

OATH hosts postgraduate fellows for a 12 week period, 20 hours per week, with two possible 8-week extensions.OATH will try to accommodate law school requirements that differ from this timeframe. Fellows work with OATH’s Office of the General Counsel and the tribunals, including the ECB Appeals Unit. Surrounded by a collegial and supportive environment, fellows will develop drafting, research, communication, and analytical skills. Typical assignments include: preparing summaries of hearing records; drafting decisions based on hearing records and relevant law; legal research; writing legal memoranda; analyzing proposed or newly adopted laws and rules affecting adjudications at OATH; drafting proposed rules; partaking in policy discussions; supporting the training of administrative law judges; assisting in defending challenges to OATH decisions in state and federal court.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Postgraduates interested in applying should submit a cover letter explaining their interest, resume, writing sample (maximum 10 pages), and unofficial law school transcript. Applications should be submitted to the attention of Diana C. Haines, Assistant General Counsel, at internships@oath.nyc.gov. Applications for fellowships accepted on a rolling basis.

 

FUNDING

 

Fellowships are unpaid. Provisions to obtain outside funding must be made before the program begins.

FALL 2016 SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC INTEREST FELLOWSHIP NOTICE TO THIRD-YEAR LAW STUDENTS AND RECENT GRADUATES

 

American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
Criminal Law Reform Project, NY

 

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion,the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

The Criminal Law Reform Project of the ACLU’s national office in New York City invites applications for the Fall 2016 Criminal Law Reform Sponsored Fellowship, which will last for one year, beginning in September 2016.

 

FELLOWSHIP OVERVIEW

The deprivation of constitutional rights in the pretrial context is widespread and results in numerous individual, community, and institutional harms. One of the most egregious harms is the unnecessary and often unlawful deprivation of liberty for people accused of crimes. Therefore, CLRP is looking to sponsor a candidate for an externally funded fellowship who would work on developing a Bail Reform Campaign in one or two jurisdictions as the centerpiece of an effort to reduce widespread constitutional violations of pretrial liberty rights and end our overreliance on pretrial detention. The fellow would develop strategic litigation focused on bail reform, while also potentially targeting other practices that clog criminal case dockets and drive jail populations, including right to counsel violations and prolonged detention, prosecutorial abuse of charging statutes, and inefficient criminal case management by the courts. The Fellow would proffer solutions such as requiring individualization in the setting of pre-trial conditions of release, increasing the use of unsecured bonds or non-monetary alternatives to money bail, mandating early appointment of meaningful counsel, and promoting pre-booking diversion programs and other evidence-based alternatives to arrest, charge, and incarceration.

The Fellow will work with CLRP staff to apply for applicable fellowship programs. The Fellow will also be responsible for preparing application materials with the support of CLRP staff and identifying potential sources of funding for the proposed fellowship.

For more information about this fellowship and how to apply, CLICK HERE.

 


Fall 2016 MARVIN M. KARPATKIN FELLOWSHIP [LGLF-06]
NOTICE TO THIRD-YEAR LAW STUDENTS AND RECENT GRADUATES

American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
Racial Justice Program, NY

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion,the ACLU takes on the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

The Racial Justice Program (RJP) of the ACLU National office in New York City invites applications for the Marvin M. Karpatkin Fellowship, which will begin in September 2016.

 

OVERVIEW

The Fellowship was established by the ACLU Board of Directors in memory of Marvin M. Karpatkin, the late General Counsel of the American Civil Liberties Union, who died in January 1975, at the age of 48. Mr. Karpatkin was one of the ACLU's most active attorneys during the 1960s and early 1970s. He left his special mark in the areas of selective service and military law. His interest in those areas grew out of his own strong opposition to the Vietnam War and his desire to help those who, younger than himself, were faced with performing military service in a war they would not support.

Racial Justice Program (RJP) attorneys and staff work to challenge racial discrimination and related issues that have a disparate impact on communities of color, particularly in the areas of criminal justice, economic justice and education. In the area of criminal justice, we are dedicated to reducing the unwarranted and disproportionate targeting and incarceration of people of color. In the area of education, we seek to ensure that all children have access to quality education, regardless of race or ethnicity, and seek to end the school-to-prison pipeline that funnels children of color out of the education system into the criminal and juvenile justice systems. We have filed civil challenges to the practice of jailing indigent persons because of their inability to pay court fines and are exploring other practices which have the effect of criminalizing poverty; we have also taken steps to challenge racial profiling and are working to counteract the negative effects of discrimination in mortgage lending on communities of color.

For more information about this fellowship and how to apply, CLICK HERE.

 


FELLOWSHIPS IN INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

For recent graduates of law schools or graduate programs in journalism, international relations, area studies, or other relevant disciplines from universities worldwide.

Unrestricted Fellowships

Alan R. and Barbara D. Finberg Fellowship - Established in memory of Alan R. and Barbara D. Finberg, early supporters of Human Rights Watch ("HRW”), this fellowship is open to recent graduates (at the Master's level) in the fields of law, journalism, international relations, or other relevant studies. Graduates with LL.B. degrees or advanced degrees in other relevant disciplines may also be considered.

Restricted Fellowships

NYU School of Law Fellowship at HRW - This fellowship is open to 2016 J.D. graduates of New York University School of Law and recent J.D. graduates who would begin the fellowship immediately upon completion of a judicial clerkship.

Leonard H. Sandler Fellowship - Established in memory of Judge Leonard H. Sandler, a 1950 Columbia Law graduate with a lifelong commitment to civil rights and liberties, this fellowship is open to recent J.D. graduates of Columbia Law School only.

JOB DESCRIPTION:

Fellows typically work full-time in Human Rights Watch’s New York or Washington, D.C. office or in some instances in another location. The NYU, Sandler, and Finberg Fellows work full-time for one year with Human Rights Watch.

Fellows monitor human rights developments in various countries, conduct on-site investigations, draft reports on human rights conditions, and engage in advocacy and media outreach aimed at publicizing and curtailing human rights violations.

Past fellows have conducted research and advocacy on numerous different issues in countries all over the world. Recent examples include projects on: police corruption and access to justice in Liberia; accessibility for people with disabilities in Russia; youth in solitary confinement in US prisons; hazardous child labor in artisanal gold mining in Tanzania; police abuse of gay men in Kyrgyzstan.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Applicants must demonstrate a strong background in international human rights and be committed to building a career in human rights. Research experience, including experience conducting interviews, ideally in the context of human rights research, is required. Field experience in human rights work is strongly desirable. Applicants must have exceptional analytic skills and excellent oral and written communications skills in English. Proficiency in one language in addition to English is strongly desired as is familiarity with countries or regions where serious human rights violations occur.

Applicants should be highly motivated and well-organized; able to work quickly and well under pressure, both independently and as a member of a team; able to juggle multiple tasks; and able to meet tight deadlines. The fellowship year will require creativity, initiative, perseverance, and flexibility while maintaining HRW's high methodological standards.

Depending on the fellowship for which they wish to apply, prospective fellows must be recent graduates of law, journalism, international relations, or other relevant studies, or must provide evidence of significant, comparable, relevant work experience. (Please see ourFrequently Asked Questionssection for the specific requirements of the various fellowships.)

Fellowships begin in September 2016.

SALARY AND BENEFITS: The salary for 2016-2017 fellows is US$55,000, plus excellent employer-paid benefits.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: OCTOBER 8, 2015

Applicants are responsible for compiling complete application packets which must include the following:
  • cover letter
  • resume
  • two letters of recommendation
  • an unedited, unpublished writing sample (no legal briefs, please)
  • an official law or graduate school transcript (applicants currently in one-year graduate programs should supply an undergraduate transcript with a list of their graduate school courses)
Complete applications (including transcripts and recommendations) for 2016-2017 fellowships must be received no later than October 8, 2015. Applications should be sent by e-mail, under single cover (in one email) and preferably as one PDF file (or, at a minimum, as separate PDF files), to:

Please include the name of the fellowship in the subject line.

Applicants must be available for interviews in New York from late November to mid-December 2015. Inquiries may be directed to fellowship@hrw.org. Please see http://www.hrw.org/fellowships for more information.

Human Rights Watch is an equal opportunity employer that does not discriminate in its hiring practices and, in order to build the strongest possible workforce, actively seeks a diverse applicant pool.

Human Rights Watch is an international human rights monitoring and advocacy organization known for its in-depth investigations, its incisive and timely reporting, its innovative and high-profile advocacy campaigns, and its success in changing the human rights-related policies and practices of influential governments and international institutions.

FALL 2016 SPONSORED FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY- ACLUF, WOMEN'S RIGHTS PROJECT

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

The Women’s Rights Project of the ACLU’s National Office in New York City seeks applicants to consider for sponsorship for Skadden, Equal Justice Works, and other public interest fellowships to begin Fall 2016.

 

OVERVIEW:

The Women’s Rights Project is part of the ACLU’s Center for Liberty, which is dedicated to the principle that we are all entitled to determine the course of our lives based on who we are and what we believe free from unreasonable government constraint and baseless stereotypes. The Center for Liberty encompasses the ACLU’s work on women’s rights, reproductive freedom, LGBT rights and the rights of people living with HIV, and freedom of religion and belief.

 

Founded in 1972 by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Women’s Rights Project (WRP) has been a leader in the legal battles to ensure women’s full equality in American society. WRP is dedicated to the advancement of the rights and interests of women to lead lives of dignity free from violence and discrimination, including discrimination based on gender stereotypes.

 

WRP focuses on women’s rights in the following priority areas: education, violence against women and employment. Through litigation, advocacy, and public education, WRP pushes for change and systemic reform in those institutions that perpetuate discrimination against women.

 

WRP conducts direct litigation, files amicus curiae briefs, provides support for ACLU affiliate litigation, serves as a resource for ACLU legislative work on women’s rights and seeks to advance ACLU policy goals through public education, organizing and coalition advocacy. The ACLU has been an active participant in virtually all of the major gender discrimination litigation in the Supreme Court, in Congressional efforts to promote gender equality, and in significant communications and public education efforts on behalf of women and girls.

 

FELLOWSHIP SPONSOR OPPORTUNITY:

The Women’s Rights Project seeks applicants to consider for sponsorship for public interest fellowships such as the Skadden and Equal Justice Works Fellowships to begin Fall 2016. WRP is particularly interested in sponsoring a candidate to work on a project advocating for the rights of pregnant, breastfeeding, and parenting workers as part of our Delivering Fairness initiative. The project will combine litigation and advocacy with public education and outreach to key stakeholders. WRP staff will work with the chosen candidate to develop the fellowship proposal.

 

DESIRED EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Must be a law school graduate by Fall 2016.
  • Excellent research, writing, analytical and communication skills.
  • Skilled at complex legal analytical work.
  • Self‑motivated and able to manage a variety of tasks.
  • Ability to work collaboratively as part of a team.
  • Committed to advancing women’s rights. Knowledge of legal issues involving women’s rights, discrimination or employment is desirable but not required.
  • Demonstrated commitment to civil liberties issues and the mission of the ACLU.

 

HOW TO APPLY:

Individuals interested in receiving WRP sponsorship should submit a letter of interest describing relevant experience and interest in the potential project areas described above, a resume, an unofficial transcript, the names and telephone numbers of three legal references, and a legal writing sample to hrjobsWRP@aclu.org, with WRP Fall 2016 Sponsored Fellowship in the subject line. Please note that this is not the general ACLU email address. This email address is specific to Women’s’ Rights postings. In order to ensure your application is received please make certain it is sent to the correct e-mail address. You can expect to receive an automatic response that acknowledges the submission of application materials.

 

Alternatively, applications can be mailed to:

 

Attention: WRP Fall 2016 Sponsored Fellowship

Women’s Rights Project

American Civil Liberties Union

125 Broad Street, 18th Floor

New York, NY 10004

 

Please indicate in your cover letter where you found this job posting.

 

We encourage applicants to send materials as soon as possible. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until a decision is made.

FALL 2016 SPONSORED FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY- ACLUF, DISABILITY RIGHTS PROGRAM [CE-07]

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

The Disability Rights Program in the Equality Center of the ACLU’s National Office in New York City and San Francisco seeks applicants for 2016 LegalFellows (with application deadlines in the Fall of 2015).

OVERVIEW:

The ACLU has a long history of defending the rights of people with disabilities. It played a major role in securing passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, has battled discrimination against persons with HIV/AIDS, and has stood up for the voting rights of persons with disabilities in the ongoing debate over electoral reform. It has fought to obtain adequate health care and access to services for prisoners with disabilities across the country and is now addressing fundamental civil rights issues in education, voting, criminal justice, and guardianship.

FELLOWSHIP OVERVIEW:

The Disability Rights Program seeks members of the Class of 2016, current judicial law clerks, or other eligible applicants to sponsor for fellowships. The ACLU has hosted fellows funded by Skadden, Equal Justice Works, Open Society Foundations, and the Ford Foundation as well as other organizations and schools.

Legal Fellows work full-time with the staff of the Disability Rights Program. While we are interested in any project or proposal that addresses core civil liberties of people with disabilities, we are particularly interested in potential fellows with interest and experience in the following civil rights issues of concern for persons with disabilities: opposing unnecessary guardianship; ending unnecessary physical restraint and seclusion in schools; advancing the needs and rights of individuals involved with the criminal justice system; and dismantling barriers to voting.

DESIRED EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Graduation from an ABA-accredited law school prior to starting the fellowship.
  • Excellent research and writing skills.
  • Ability to work independently and manage a varied and demanding workload.
  • Demonstrated commitment to civil rights and disability rights issues.
  • Interest in and experience with legislative and advocacy approaches to social change a plus.
  • Knowledge of disability rights laws and personal experience with disability preferred.

HOW TO APPLY:

Individuals interested in receiving sponsorship from the Disability Rights Program of the ACLU should send a letter of interest describing potential projects, a resume, an unofficial transcript, the names and phone numbers of 2 – 3 legal references and a legal writing sample (no more than five pages) to:

mazhar@aclu.org

Please Reference: 2016 Legal Fellowship – Equality Center- Disability in the subject line

or mail to:

American Civil Liberties Union

RE: 2016 Legal Fellowship – Equality Center- Disability

39 Drumm Street, 4th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94111

Please indicate in your cover letter where you learned of this opportunity.

Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted until August 10th. However, we will review applications as they arrive, conduct regular interviews, and decisions will be made on a rolling basis.

This job description provides a general but not comprehensive list of the essential responsibilities and qualifications required. It does not represent a contract of employment. The ACLU reserves the right to change the description and/or posting at any time without advance notice.

SUMMER 2016 LEGAL INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITY- ACLUF, IMMIGRANTS' RIGHTS PROJECT:

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Immigrants’ Rights Project seeks full-time legal interns for the Summer of 2016. A stipend is available for those students who do not receive outside funding and/or course credit. Arrangements can also be made with the student’s law school for work/study stipends or course credit.

OVERVIEW

The Immigrants’ Rights Project is a national project of the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation with offices in New York and California. Using targeted impact litigation, advocacy and public outreach, the Project carries on the ACLU’s historic commitment to protecting the civil rights and civil liberties of immigrants. In federal district and appellate courts, including the Supreme Court, the Project conducts the nation’s largest impact litigation program dedicated to defending and expanding the rights of immigrants, enforcing the guarantees of the Constitution, and achieving equal justice under the law.

The Project has focused on challenging laws that deny immigrants access to the judicial system, impose indefinite and mandatory detention, and constitute discrimination on the basis of "alienage” by governmental and private entities. In addition, the Project has been challenging constitutional abuses that arise from immigration enforcement at the federal, state, and local levels, including litigation against worksite and home raids, local anti-immigrant employment and housing laws, and improper enforcement of federal immigration laws by local sheriffs. IRP’s efforts in the enforcement arena seek to ensure the constitutional protections of the Fourth, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendments, combat racial profiling arising from actual or pretextual immigration enforcement that subjects immigrant communities to racism and hostility, and challenge government policies and practices that undermine or deny immigrants’ ability to effectuate their existing legal rights.

The Education component of the Project provides information about immigrants’ rights to immigrant communities nationwide. The Project works with the English and non-English language media, immigrant advocacy organizations and ACLU affiliates around the country to empower immigrant communities through presentations about their rights and about current and proposed immigration laws.

Working closely with IRP staff, legal interns will work in all aspects of litigation including legal research, factual investigation, and drafting of memoranda, affidavits, and briefs. Interns may also support IRP staff in providing support and advice to ACLU affiliates, private attorneys, and others who seeks our help; screening potential cases; and researching or drafting materials for public education. Interns will attend regular staff meetings.

INTERNSHIP OVERVIEW

This internship offers the opportunity to work on a variety of litigation projects. The internship is full-time and typically requires a 10 week commitment, with a preferred start date of May 31, 2016.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Interns will have the opportunity to gain valuable experience by working alongside the Immigrants’ Rights Project team in all aspects of litigation, and will gain experience by working on the following:

  • Conducting legal and policy research.
  • Drafting memoranda, affidavits and briefs.
  • Researching prospects for new litigation, including both factual and legal claims.
  • Supporting research and drafting of materials for public education.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS

  • One year of law school must be completed before the internship commences.
  • Commitment to civil liberties and immigrants’ rights and an interest in working toward racial and social justice.
  • Strong writing and research skills.

HOW TO APPLY

Applicants should send a 1-2 page cover letter describing your interest in immigrants’ rights and civil liberties, including any relevant life or work experience gained before or during law school; resume; legal writing sample; contact information for two or three references; and transcript to hrjobsIRP@aclu.org. Please reference [IRP Summer 2016 Legal Internship/ACLU-AABA] in the subject line. Please specify your desired office location in the cover letter (San Francisco/New York).

If you are interested in both offices, please apply separately to each and indicate that you have done so in your cover letter. This email address is specific to Immigrants’ Rights Project postings. In order to ensure your application is received, please make certain it is sent to the correct e-mail address.

Please indicate in your cover letter where you learned of this internship opportunity.

Students are encouraged to submit applications as early as possible, as decisions are made on a rolling basis.

This job description provides a general but not comprehensive list of the essential responsibilities and qualifications required. It does not represent a contract of employment. The ACLU reserves the right to change the description and/or posting at any time without advance notice.

2016 FALL ACLU CAPITAL PUNISHMENT PROJECT FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY [CPP-11]

 

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

The Capital Punishment Project(CPP) of the ACLU’s national office in Durham, North Carolina seeks applicants for a sponsored fellowship such as Equal Justice Works, Ford Foundation, or other public interest fellowships to begin in the Fall of 2016.

OVERVIEW

The Capital Punishment Project, part of the ACLU’s Center for Justice, challenges the unfairness and arbitrariness of capital punishment while working toward the ultimate goal of abolishing the death penalty. The Project engages in public advocacy and strategic litigation, including direct representation of capital defendants. The Project’s litigation is conducted throughout the country, with a particular focus on the South.

FELLOWSHIP OVERVIEW

The Capital Punishment Project staff will work with the selected candidate to develop the fellowship proposal.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS

  • JD or expected receipt of JD by the Fall of 2016.
  • Knowledge of criminal defense and capital law is preferred but not required.
  • Excellent legal research and writing skills.
  • Strong writing and verbal communication skills.
  • Experience with complex legal analytical work.
  • Ability to work independently as well as within a team.
  • Self-motivated and capable of managing a variety of tasks.
  • Excellent computer skills including knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Commitment to civil liberties, civil rights, social justice and death penalty abolition.

COMPENSATION

The ACLU offers a generous and comprehensive compensation and benefits package, commensurate with experience and within parameters of the ACLU compensation scale.

HOW TO APPLY

Individuals interested in receiving CPP sponsorship should send a letter of interest describing potential projects, a resume, an unofficial transcript, the names and telephone numbers of two legal references, and a legal writing sample to hrjobsCPP@aclu.org - reference[CPP-11 Sponsored Fellowship/ACLU-W] in the subject line.

Please indicate in your cover letter where you learned of this fellowship opportunity.

The application deadline is August 15, 2015.

Applicants are encouraged to submit materials as early as possible, as decisions are made on a rolling basis.

This job description provides a general but not comprehensive list of the essential responsibilities and qualifications required. It does not represent a contract of employment. The ACLU reserves the right to change the description and/or posting at any time without advance notice.

The ACLU is an equal opportunity employer. We value a diverse workforce and an inclusive culture. The ACLU encourages applications from all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, national origin, marital status, citizenship, disability, and veteran status.

The ACLU undertakes affirmative action strategies in its recruitment and employment efforts to assure that persons with disabilities have full opportunities for employment in all positions.

We encourage applicants with disabilities who may need accommodations in the application process to contact:hrjobsincl@aclu.org. Correspondence sent to this email address that is not related to requests for accommodations will not be reviewed. Applicants should follow the instructions above regarding how to apply.

The ACLU comprises two separate corporate entities, the American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU Foundation. Both the American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU Foundation are national organizations with the same overall mission, and share office space and employees. The ACLU has two separate corporate entities in order to do a broad range of work to protect civil liberties. This job posting refers collectively to the two organizations under the name "ACLU.”

FALL 2016 ACLU FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY, LESBIAN GAY BISEXUAL TRANSGENDER & HIV PROJECT [LGBT-17]

 

For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s ending mass incarceration, achieving full equality for the LGBT community, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than a million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., for the principle that every individual’s rights must be protected equally under the law, regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, disability or national origin.

 
The Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and HIV Project of the ACLU’s National Office in New York City is seeking to sponsor a candidate for fellowships to begin in the Fall of 2016.

 

 
OVERVIEW
 
Founded in 1986, the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) & HIV Project is a division of the national ACLU. It is part of the ACLU’s Center for Liberty, which encompasses the ACLU’s work on women’s rights, reproductive freedom, LGBT rights and the rights of people living with HIV, and freedom of religion and belief. The Center for Liberty is dedicated to the principle that we are all entitled to determine the course of our lives based on who we are and what we believe, free from unreasonable government constraint and baseless stereotypes. The goal of the Project is the creation of a society in which lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and people with HIV enjoy the basic rights of equality, privacy, personal autonomy, and freedom of belief, expression and association. This means an America where people can live open and honest lives without fear of discrimination or abuse, and where everyone enjoys respect for their identities, relationships and families, and enjoys fair treatment in employment, schools, health care, housing and public places and programs.
 
The Project brings "impact” lawsuits in state and federal courts throughout the country –– cases designed to have a significant effect on the lives of LGBT people and those living with HIV. The Project’s legal strategies are built on the idea that fighting for civil rights means not only persuading judges but also ultimately changing the way people think. As the Project litigates for change, it implements targeted media, online and outreach campaigns to change public attitudes through education and to give people on the frontlines the tools they need to act.
 
As a part of the ACLU, the Project is in a unique position to work for justice for LGBT people and people living with HIV. The ACLU’s national network of affiliates broadens the Project’s reach into every locality and into the federal government. Today, the ACLU brings more LGBT cases and advocacy initiatives than any other national civil rights organization. The Project strives to ensure that the racial and economic diversity of the LGBT community is reflected in its work and continues to explore ways to make its efforts more responsive to the needs of people of color and people living in poverty. The Project’s work as part of the broad civil liberties agenda of the ACLU, exemplifies the notion that the LGBT community and the community of those living with HIV must work in concert with other social change movements in order to achieve a just society for all.
 
 
The LGBT & HIV Project is seeking to sponsor a candidate for fellowship funding through Skadden, Equal Justice Works and other programs to develop a proposal focusing on the rights of transgender individuals to enjoy meaningful access to health care, identification documents and single-sex spaces consistent with gender identity.
 
The candidate will work jointly with Project staff to apply for applicable fellowship programs. In this process the fellow will be responsible for preparing application materials with the support of Project staff and identifying potential sources of funding for the proposed fellowship.
 
If selected, the fellow will be responsible for:

 

 
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
 
•Identifying, preparing, and filing litigation on behalf of transgender individuals in health care, identification documents and cases regarding single sex spaces.
•Developing legislative strategies in support of affirmative protections for transgender individuals in federal, state and local law and opposing efforts to restrict or limit such protections.
•Developing public education tools for building awareness of transgender individuals and how existing law protects transgender individuals’ right to access health care, identification documents and single sex spaces consistent with gender identity.
•Researching prospects for new litigation, including both factual and legal claims.
•Supervising interns’ work in support of the above.

 

 
EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS
 
•J.D. degree, or expected law school graduation in the spring of 2016.
•Excellent research, writing, analytical and communication skills.
•Familiarity with legal issues impacting LGBT individuals and people living with HIV.
•Demonstrated commitment to issues affecting transgender communities.
•The ability to work independently as well as collaboratively with a wide range of people.
•Demonstrated commitment to civil liberties issues and the mission of the ACLU.

 

 
COMPENSATION
 
The ACLU offers a generous and comprehensive compensation and benefits package, commensurate with experience and within parameters of the ACLU compensation scale.

HOW TO APPLY
 
Applicants should send a cover letter explaining in detail the applicant’s interest in the project and fellowship, a resume, and a legal writing sample to: hrjobsLGBT@aclu.org –– Reference [LGBT-17/ACLU-W] in the subject line.
 
Please note that this is not the general ACLU applicant email address. This email address is specific to LGBT & HIV Project postings. In order to ensure your application is received, please make certain it is sent to the correct e-mail address. You can expect to receive an automatic response that acknowledges the submission of application materials.
 
Alternatively, applications can be mailed to:
 
American Civil Liberties Union Foundation
 
RE: [LGBT-17/ACLU-W]
125 Broad Street, 18th Floor
New York, NY 10004

 

 
Please indicate in your cover letter where you learned of this fellowship opportunity.

Applications must be received by August 5, 2015.

The NAPABA Law Foundation Partners and In-House Counsel Community Law Fellowship

IMPORTANT DEADLINES

June 30, 2015 The 2016 application is available

Sept. 18, 2015 The application and supporting paperwork must be received by email 5:00 PM EST

October 2015 Interviews begin for selected candidates

November 2015 Fellowship awarded

September 2016 Community Law Fellow begins service

 

TERMS OF A FELLOWSHIP

The NAPABA Law Foundation Partners and In-House Counsel Community Law Fellowship Program (NLF Community Law Fellowship) requires a two-year commitment from the Fellow and Host Organization, which runs from September 2016 through August 2018. Earlier start dates might be possible for certain applicants (e.g., judicial clerks, recent law grads) provided that the total Fellowship does not exceed 24 months.

 

The NLF Community Law Fellowship provides funds directly to the Host Organization for the Fellowship, including a salary of $45,000 per year with a $10,000 payment to the Fellow upon completion of the Fellowship. The Host Organization shall be the employer of the Fellow and will be responsible for providing health and fringe benefits.

HOW TO APPLY

 

  • All applications must be received by email by 5:00 PM EST on September 18, 2015.

Please review the "Frequently Asked Questions” section before contacting the NAPABA Law Foundation.

OVERVIEW

The NLF Community Law Fellowship was launched in 2004 to address the need for attorneys working on behalf of the AAPI populations. Recognizing that many obstacles prevent committed attorneys from practicing public interest law, including the shortage of entry-level jobs, the NLF Community Law Fellowship provides an opportunity for an entry-level attorney to gain substantive experience at a national nonprofit or community-based organization during the two-year Fellowship period.

 

The NLF Community Law Fellowship seeks to develop public interest law leaders of the future, whether they continue to work in the nonprofit arena or become pro bono advocates in the private bar. The NLF Community Law Fellowship was established by a generous gift from Paul W. Lee of Goodwin Procter LLP to The NAPABA Law Foundation. Today, the NAPABA Law Foundation makes available and funds two Community Law Fellows. The NLF Community Law Fellowship is currently funded through the generous gifts of NAPABA members and Friends of NLF. The Program is administered through the NAPABA Law Foundation, which is a charitable organization that awards scholarships, internships and fellowships, runs the Thomas Tang National Moot Court Competition and presents other educational programs to advance issues important to the AAPI community.

 

FELLOWSHIP CANDIDATE AND HOST ELIGIBILITY

• Candidates must be a third-year law student, recent law school graduate (2015 graduating year), or a recent judicial clerk or non-public interest fellow (departed service in 2015) with a demonstrated commitment to public interest law and AAPI issues.

 

• Candidates must identify a nonprofit Host Organization that will provide him/her with a full-time position once a Fellowship is awarded. Candidates cannot be a current full-time employee with the same organization, though they may have had a prior internship with a Host Organization. Furthermore, because it is intended that the candidate focus his or her efforts on the Fellowship and its attendant commitments, the candidate may not seek other full or part-time employment with any other employer once the Fellowship is granted and may not engage in other employment during the Fellowship period.

 

• Host Organizations are nonprofit organizations that agree to employ the Community Law Fellow during the two-year Fellowship term if awarded. They must also provide him/her with supervision, training, employee health and fringe benefits, a workspace, and the materials that he/she will need to complete a designated project during the Fellowship.

• Together with his/her Host Organization, the Candidate and Host Organization must create and manage aproject that focuses on legal issues affecting AAPIs. The project proposal should clearly state how the project will address a specific legal matter, how it will positively impact the AAPI population, and how the Host Organization will provide resources and support the Fellow’s efforts. Project proposals shall not exceed three pages in length.

FELLOWSHIP CANDIDATE EVALUATION CRITERIA

  • The Candidate’s demonstrated or stated commitment to public interest law generally, and specifically to the AAPI community and/or the selected project area in which s/he is planning to work.
  • The Candidate’s professional, volunteer and/or subject matter expertise indicating that s/he possesses the relevant skills and initiative to make the selected project a success.
  • The Candidate’s demonstrated or potential for leadership.
  • The Candidate’s commitment and ability to fulfill the two-year term required by the program.
  • The NLF Community Law Fellowship strongly encourages applications from Candidates reflecting diverse cultural and experiential backgrounds, people with disabilities, people of diverse ethnic, racial, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds, work experiences, national origins, sexual orientations, and ages.

 

HOST ORGANIZATION EVALUATION CRITERIA

• The nonprofit organization's ability and commitment to provide the proper training, support, and supervision throughout the Fellowship project.

• The role of the project fits within the mission and priorities of the Host Organization.

• The organization's ability and commitment to provide health insurance and other standard employee benefits to the Fellow during the term of the Fellowship.

 

NYLPI 2016 Post Graduate Fellowship

2016 Post-Graduate Fellowship Opportunities: Advancing Justice through Community Lawyering in New York City

New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (NYLPI), a non-profit civil rights legal organization, is accepting applications from candidates for post-graduate fellowship opportunities in its Health Justice, Disability Justice, and Environmental Justice programs. The Fellow would begin in the fall of 2016.

NYLPI pioneered the practice of community lawyering in New York City, working on the premise that every New Yorker has the basic civil right to thrive. With every case and campaign, we partner with members of marginalized communities on advocacy that is ambitious, participatory, and dynamic.

Our activism focuses on issues of racial equality and disability rights. Our Health Justice Program represents immigrant and detained individuals with serious health care needs, provides support to community-based organizations mobilizing on the ground, and seeks to rid the New York health care system of racism, language barriers and anti-immigrant bias. Our Disability Justice Program defends and promotes the civil rights of people with disabilities in transportation, education, health care, and other aspects of life, as well as ensuring that people with disabilities are able to live with independence and dignity. In our Environmental Justice Program, we work with community-based and city-wide coalitions to address issues such as the overburdening of low-income communities of color with garbage facilities and the presence of dangerous toxins in public schools. NYLPI’s renowned Pro Bono Clearinghouse connects community organizations throughout NYC with pro bono attorneys from the City’s largest law firms and creates pro bono partnerships that expand the reach and impact of our advocacy.

About the Fellowship and the Application Process: NYLPI seeks highly accomplished, progressive, community-minded candidates with excellent research and writing skills to advance the goals of our programs. Organizations such as Equal Justice Works and the Skadden Fellowship Foundation provide two-year fellowships to graduating law students, outgoing judicial clerks and, in the case of Equal Justice Works, experienced attorneys who are motivated to work at a public interest law office.

All public interest fellowship programs are competitive and applicants need time to develop project proposals and complete applications. NYLPI thus strongly encourages all interested applicants to apply as early as possible. Candidates should submit a cover letter, resume, writing sample, most recent transcript (official or unofficial) and three references, including daytime telephone numbers, to Fabian Gomez at fellowships@nylpi.org as soon as possible but no later than 5pm on June 29, 2015. Candidates should also complete the following online form when they submit their applications: Click here for form.

Candidates with fellowship project ideas are encouraged to discuss them in the cover letter, but it is not necessary to have a developed project proposal in order to apply. NYLPI has successfully sponsored numerous fellows in the past and works closely with candidates to craft effective proposals and prepare for fellowship interviews. Please note: only 3Ls graduating in 2016 or outgoing judicial clerks are eligible to apply for Skadden Fellowships. Equal Justice Works will also consider experienced attorneys. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis.