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Fellowship Announcements
 

Please see below announcements about current Fellowships:

 

 Fall 2020 Legal Fellowship Sponsorship - Bronx Legal Services NYC 

 

Bronx Legal Services seeks applicants to sponsor for fellowships beginning Fall 2020.

Bronx Legal Services, the Bronx office of Legal Services NYC, is the largest provider of free civil legal services in the borough, and the largest single legal services office in New York City. Our mission is to advance society's promise to its most vulnerable members that all are entitled to equal access to justice through our legal system. Specifically, we are seeking fellowship applicants for Skadden, Equal Justice Works, Kirkland & Ellis and other outside funded fellowships for our Economic Justice, Family and Immigration, Foreclosure, LGBTQ Advocacy and Public Benefits Units.

Our Economic Justice Unit advocates for workers’ rights in the workplace, and representsindividuals seeking unemployment benefits. In addition we assist consumers with a range of debt collection issues in and out of court, including student loans, nursing home and medical debt, credit card debt. We represent low‐income taxpayers in federal and related state tax disputes, ensuring they receive credits they are entitled to, relieving them from collection efforts and penalties, or helping them achieve affordable payment plans. The Unit also helps seniors over the age of 60 prepare wills, health care proxies, and powers of attorney. We defend seniors facing issues with home health care, Medicaid and Medicare, nursing home problems, disability, public benefits, consumer law problems, SCRIE, elder abuse. As well, our Unit represents low‐income disabled children and adults in federal disability benefits applications and in cessation hearings.

Our Family and Immigration Unit is engaged in individual and systemic advocacy regarding intimate partner violence, sexual assault, elder abuse and other forms of violence in a wide range of family and immigration matters, including orders of protection, custody/visitation, child/spousal support, U & T nonimmigrant status, VAWA, SIJS, and asylum. It also does workregarding family‐based immigration applications and naturalizations, trying to keep children out of the foster care system, family reunification, and supporting employment by clearing records of maltreatment with the New York State Central Registry.

Our Foreclosure Unit works to stem the tide of foreclosures brought on by the historic foreclosure crisis of the last decade. Many Bronx communities of color have been targeted with abusive mortgages while disproportionately being denied conventional mortgages and other financial services. Through litigation, representation in court settlement conferences and non‐litigation advocacy outside of court, the Foreclosure Prevention unit seeks to end these abusive practices while remediating the legacy of predatory lending in the Bronx by transforming these mortgages into affordable loans that preserve homeownership and retain wealth in the form of home equity.

Our LGBTQ Advocacy Project handles individual cases and identifies systemic issues affecting these communities. We handle a wide variety of matters in a general practice model including immigration, public benefits, family, divorce, domestic/intimate partner violence, health, and education matters. Our Project coordinates with LSNYC's Citywide LGBTQIH Project and works closely with CBOs throughout the City who work with LGBTQ‐identified people.

Our Public Benefits Unit represents clients challenging denials or reductions of public assistance, Medicaid, home care, and SNAP benefits. It represents clients in administrative Fair Hearings and appeals in Supreme Court Article 78 proceedings. We also pursue affirmative litigation to challenge systemic barriers that prevent or limit access to benefits by working people, the disabled, and individuals requiring language access.

Interested individuals should send a cover letter, a resume, two writing samples, and three references to:

Sandra Sanchez, Assistant to the Project Director

Bronx Legal Services, 349 East 149th Street, 10th Floor, Bronx, NY 10451 Email: [email protected]

 Fall 2019 Law Intern/Fellow Program for Students and Recent Graduates - NYC Department of Investigation's Office of the Inspector General for the NYPD

 

The New York City Department of Investigation’s (DOI) Office of the Inspector General for the NYPD (OIG-NYPD) is charged with investigating, reviewing, studying, auditing, and making recommendations regarding the operations, policies, programs, and practices of the New York City Police Department, with the goal of enhancing the effectiveness of the NYPD, increasing public safety, protecting civil liberties and civil rights, and increasing the public’s confidence in the police force. OIG-NYPD is independent of the NYPD and is part of the New York City Department of Investigation.  For more information, visit  www.nyc.gov/html/oignypd

OIG-NYPD is seeking energetic law student interns and/or post-graduate legal fellows to assist OIG-NYPD attorneys and investigators in a wide range of legal and investigative projects.  The positions offer an opportunity to work on cutting-edge issues of public concern in a high-profile environment.  Interns/Fellows will examine legal topics relating to active reviews and investigations of NYPD policies and practices, research and draft legal documents, summarize pertinent case law and legislation, support OIG-NYPD operations, review investigative material, assist with inquiries received by OIG-NYPD, participate in internal staff meetings and external meetings with key stakeholders, and help develop legal strategies and policies.  These positions are unpaid.

Qualified candidates should be enthusiastic about working in government and on police accountability, law enforcement, civil rights, and criminal justice issues.  Candidates should demonstrate good judgment, high ethical standards, strong analytical and writing skills, and a proactive attitude. All candidates are required to clear a background check.

To apply, please submit a resume, letter of interest, transcript, and a short (5-10 page) legal writing sample via email or postal service to the address below. Writing samples that contain legal arguments and analysis are preferred over general research papers or legal journal articles/notes.

Asim Rehman
Deputy Inspector General
Office of Inspector General for the NYPD
NYC Department of Investigation
80 Maiden Lane, 14th Floor
New York, NY  10038
[email protected]
(Subject Line: Law Internship/Fellowship Fall 2019)

 

In addition to internships with the Inspector General for the NYPD, the NYC Department of Investigation offers internships with Inspector Generals of other NYC agencies as well as with DOI’s General Counsel unit and other internal functions. To apply for one of these DOI internships, please visit http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doi/about/internships.page

Applicants participating in a formal  internship program through their school should specify the duratioof the program anthe number of hours they will be available and/or required to work and include the necessary supervisory procedures for obtaining course credit from their schools. Candidates will be required to work a minimum of 15 hours per week from September through December.

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis and the posting will close once positions are filled.  Deadline to submit your resume and cover letter is June 21, 2019. Questions may be directed to the email address above.

 

Fall 2020 Legal Fellowship Sponsorship - National Prison Project/Women's Rights Project
American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, NY or DC

The ACLU invites second- or third-year law students and recent law graduates to apply for a sponsorship opportunity to work with us as a Legal Fellow. The National Prison Project and the Women’s Rights Project of the National office based in D.C. and New York, respectively, seek applicants to consider for a sponsored fellowship such as Skadden, Equal Justice Works, or other public interest fellowships to begin in the fall of 2020.

The National Prison Project (NPP) seeks to ensure constitutional conditions of confinement in prisons, jails, juvenile facilities, and immigration detention facilities. The Project has successfully litigated on behalf of prisoners in more than 25 states, and since 1991 has represented prisoners in five cases before the United States Supreme Court. The Project is the only organization litigating conditions of confinement cases nationwide on behalf of men, women, and children. NPP policy priorities include reducing prison overcrowding, improving prisoner health care, eliminating violence and maltreatment, and increasing oversight and accountability in prisons, jails, and other places of detention. You can learn more about the work of the National Prison Project here.

The Women’s Rights Project is part of the ACLU’s Center for Liberty, which is dedicated to the principle that we are all entitled to determine the course of our lives based on who we are and what we believe, free from unreasonable government constraint and baseless stereotypes. The Center for Liberty encompasses the ACLU’s work on women’s rights, reproductive freedom, LGBT rights and the rights of people living with HIV, freedom of religion and belief, and the rights of people with disabilities. Founded in 1972 by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Women's Rights Project (WRP) has been a leader in the legal battles to ensure women’s full equality in American society. WRP is dedicated to the advancement of the rights and interests of women and works to break down gender stereotypes that limit opportunities for individuals. You can learn more about the work of the Women’s Rights Project here.

We are particularly interested in a project combatting sexual violence behind bars. Fifteen years after the passage of the landmark Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), pervasive sexual violence behind bars remains a nationwide problem. Although DOJ and ICE adopted comprehensive regulations to implement the law in 2012 and 2014 respectively, in practice they have largely been realized on paper rather than on the ground – and have not created the major cultural and operational shift in correctional institutions originally anticipated. The result is that thousands of people continue to suffer rape, sexual abuse and sexual harassment with little to no protections in institutions across the country. Women, LGBT and gender non-conforming prisoners are particularly vulnerable, regardless of whether they are in custody for immigration or criminal violations. Trans and gender nonconforming incarcerated people also experience high rates of sexual violence from both staff and other prisoners.  Trans women placed in men’s prisons against their will face particularly heightened vulnerability. With the ongoing detention of individuals for immigration violations and continued high incarceration rates generally, the need for actualizing the potential of PREA, and urging greater protection, is even more urgent.

The ACLU National Prison Project (NPP) has been a key proponent of strengthening PREA to protect men, women and children in prison, jail and detention settings at all levels. But more needs to be done and NPP is in a unique position to do this work because of its national reach and existing expertise. The Women’s Rights Project (WRP) has fought to create greater state accountability for government perpetuation of violence against women, through litigation and advocacy identifying such violence as a civil rights issue. While case authorities enforcing and applying PREA standards are sparse in the criminal incarceration context, they are even fewer in the immigration detention field.  This fellow will allow NPP and WRP to significantly advance both advocacy and litigation in the arena of combatting sexual violence behind bars.

The fellowship is intended to focus on two primary areas. The first focus area will be on providing technical assistance and training to ACLU affiliates and allies on methods to use DOJ and ICE audit data related to PREA to improve and monitor correctional policies in their home jurisdictions.

The second prong of the fellowship will focus on developing the law around sexual violence in custodial settings.  The dearth of case law provides an opportunity to create positive judicial precedent in select states or circuits. In addition, a gap in the law exists around the issue of consent behind bars.  In order to more actively shape the law in this area, the fellow will work with NPP’s Appellate Litigation Project to monitor pro se prisoner and detainee filings to identify promising cases and potentially file amicus briefs or offer to serve as appellate counsel. The fellow will also collaborate with the ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project to identify potential cases.

Roles and Responsibilities

  • Conduct legal research and analysis and develop theories to support new litigation projects.
  • Draft legal memoranda, pleadings, affidavits, motions, and briefs.
  • Interview witnesses and potential clients.
  • Participate in discovery and trial practice.
  • Draft and edit public education and non-litigation advocacy materials.
  • Provide support and assistance to ACLU affiliates and cooperating attorneys.
  • Help manage summer legal internship program and supervise student interns.
  • Engage in public speaking and attend meetings and/or conferences as needed.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to diversity within the office using a personal approach that values all individuals and respects differences in regards to race, ethnicity, age, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, religion, ability and socio-economic circumstance.
  • Commitment to work collaboratively and respectfully toward resolving obstacles and/or conflicts.

Experience and Qualifications

  • J.D. or expected to receive a J.D by the spring of 2020.
  • Demonstrated commitment to public interest law, civil liberties, gender justice, racial justice, prisoners’ rights, immigrants’ rights, and eradicating gender-based violence and sexual violence behind bars.
  • Willingness to work closely with the National Prison Project and the Women’s Rights Project through the funding application process.
  • Excellent research, writing, and verbal communication skills.
  • Demonstrated ability to conduct complex legal analysis and fact-finding.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and a proven ability to work independently as well as within a team.
  • Self-motivated with the ability to take initiative, manage a variety of tasks and see projects through to completion.
  • Commitment to the mission of the ACLU.

Compensation

The ACLU offers a generous and comprehensive compensation and benefits package, commensurate with experience and within parameters of the ACLU compensation scale, to supplement the external funding.

To Apply

If you would like to be considered for a sponsorship opportunity, please submit: a letter of interest that includes a description of a project proposal (please indicate in your letter of interest whether you only seek sponsorship for your proposal or would be open to other ideas)

  • current resume
  • legal writing sample
  • names and telephone numbers of three references

Materials should be sent to [email protected] referencing “2020 Legal Fellowship Sponsorship – National Prison Project/Women’s Rights Project” in the subject line.

We will review applications on a rolling basis, but priority consideration will be given to those who submit applications by June 10, 2019.

The ACLU is an equal opportunity employer. We value a diverse workforce and an inclusive culture. The ACLU encourages applications from all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, marital status, citizenship, disability, record of arrest or conviction, and veteran status.

Fall 2020 Legal Fellowship Sponsorship - Women's Rights Project
American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, NY

The ACLU invites second- or third-year law students and recent law graduates to apply for a sponsorship opportunity to work with us as a Legal Fellow. The Women’s Rights Project of the National office in New York seeks applicants to consider for a sponsored fellowship such as Skadden, Equal Justice Works, or other public interest fellowships to begin in the fall of 2020.

Founded in 1972 by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Women's Rights Project (WRP) has been a leader in the legal battles to ensure women’s full equality in American society. WRP is dedicated to the advancement of the rights and interests of women and works to break down gender stereotypes that limit opportunities for individuals. Through litigation, advocacy, grassroots mobilization, and public education, WRP pushes for change and systemic reform in those institutions that perpetuate discrimination based on gender.  WRP has been an active participant in virtually all of the major gender discrimination litigation in the Supreme Court, in advocacy efforts for women’s rights at the state and federal level, and in significant communications efforts on behalf of women and girls.

We are particularly interested in a project addressing bias in big data and algorithms. Increasingly, the widespread adoption of artificial intelligence in both public and private decisions means that engaging with algorithmic systems is crucial to protecting civil rights and civil liberties in the twenty-first century. The ACLU is uniquely well-positioned to address these issues because it possesses deep expertise on both civil rights enforcement, and on the impacts of big-data driven tools and digital systems on equality. The Women’s Rights Project, Racial Justice Project and the Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project work at the intersection of these technology-driven concerns, seeking to protect the rights of those most harmed by the explosive growth of these new systems—members of groups already marginalized by discrimination and exclusion.

Building on litigation already filed by the National ACLU and its affiliates relating to algorithmic discrimination, the fellow’s project will focus on one or both of the following two emerging areas, depending on their interest and the potential external sponsor:

(1)          Challenging the practice of “Weblining” by developing litigation challenging creation of digital marketing tools on platforms that exclude users from receiving advertisements for economic opportunities, such as jobs, housing, or credit, based on discriminatory criteria including gender and race.

(2)          Challenging the use of predictive analytics in child welfare interventions. The fellow will develop litigation challenging the secrecy surrounding use of predictive analytics for identifying families for investigation as well as family unification plans and removals.

Roles and Responsibilities

  • Conduct legal research and analysis and develop theories to support new litigation projects.
  • Draft legal memoranda, pleadings, affidavits, motions, and briefs.
  • Interview witnesses and potential clients.
  • Participate in discovery and trial practice.
  • Draft and edit public education and non-litigation advocacy materials.
  • Provide support and assistance to ACLU affiliates and cooperating attorneys.
  • Help manage summer legal internship program and supervise student interns.
  • Engage in public speaking and attend meetings and/or conferences as needed.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to diversity within the office using a personal approach that values all individuals and respects differences in regards to race, ethnicity, age, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, religion, ability and socio-economic circumstance.
  • Commitment to work collaboratively and respectfully toward resolving obstacles and/or conflicts.

Experience and Qualifications

  • J.D. or expected to receive a J.D by the spring of 2020.
  • Demonstrated commitment to public interest law, civil liberties, gender justice, racial justice, and/or eradicating employment, housing, credit, and algorithmic discrimination..
  • Willingness to work closely with the Women’s Rights Project through the funding application process.
  • Excellent research, writing, and verbal communication skills.
  • Demonstrated ability to conduct complex legal analysis and fact-finding.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and a proven ability to work independently as well as within a team.
  • Self-motivated with the ability to take initiative, manage a variety of tasks and see projects through to completion.
  • Commitment to the mission of the ACLU.

Compensation

The ACLU offers a generous and comprehensive compensation and benefits package, commensurate with experience and within parameters of the ACLU compensation scale, to supplement the external funding.

To Apply

If you would like to be considered for a sponsorship opportunity, please submit: a letter of interest that includes a description of a project proposal (please indicate in your letter of interest whether you only seek sponsorship for your proposal or would be open to other ideas)

  • current resume
  • legal writing sample
  • names and telephone numbers of three references

Materials should be sent to [email protected] referencing “2020 Legal Fellowship Sponsorship – Women’s Rights Project” in the subject line.

We will review applications on a rolling basis, but priority consideration will be given to those who submit applications by June 10, 2019.

The ACLU is an equal opportunity employer. We value a diverse workforce and an inclusive culture. The ACLU encourages applications from all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, marital status, citizenship, disability, record of arrest or conviction, and veteran status.

National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) Law Fellowship

National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW) is a small nonprofit 501c(3) organization that works to secure the rights and human dignity of all women, particularly pregnant and parenting women and those who are most vulnerable to state control and punishment including low income women, women of color, and drug-using women. NAPW uses an integrated set of strategies that combines legal advocacy; local and national organizing; and public education. NAPW seeks to build bridges across diverse public health and social justice movements, and to connect local organizing and activism with national advocacy and policy work. NAPW has a commitment to advancing the civil and human rights of all people including transgender people. The organization is actively involved in ongoing court challenges to punitive reproductive health and drug policies and provides litigation support in cases across the country.

NAPW engages in:

  • Litigation, litigation support, and public policy development;
  • Public education including continuing education programs, being a media resource and acting as a national clearinghouse that provides lawyers, activists, policy-makers, organizers and the media with essential information on case law, legislation, and social science data regarding the war on abortion, the war on drugs, mass incarceration and birth justice;
  • Grassroots and grass-tops organizing including support for state-based programs and supporting people directly affected by punitive policies. 

Position Description:
NAPW seeks applicants for the position of Law Fellow to begin in the Fall of 2019. If selected, the candidate will be responsible for securing funding through a fellowship (such as Soros, Equal Justice Works, or other public interest law fellowship), as NAPW will not provide compensation. Candidates should identify potential sources of funding before applying but do not need to have secured such funding at the time of application submission.

The Law Fellow will design the project in conjunction with NAPW’s Director of Legal Advocacy. As a small and dynamic non-profit organization, NAPW offers Fellows the opportunity to undertake significant legal work, community organizing and policy advocacy, media writing and public speaking, and the opportunity to attend conferences and make site visits to clients.

Responsibilities may include:

  • Participating in constitutional and statutory litigation;
  • Legal research and writing;
  • Social science and medical research and writing;
  • Drafting motions and briefs;
  • Maintaining regular contact with clients;
  • Tracking and analyzing developments in state and federal legislation and at the United Nations; • Conducting intake and respond to help inquiries;
  • Engaging in public speaking and attend meetings/conferences;
  • Writing pieces for publication;
  • Liaising with other reproductive justice, social justice, economic justice and drug policy, child welfare, and criminal justice reform organizations to jointly develop and undertake community organizing;
  • Supervising student interns. 

Experience and Qualifications:

  • J.D. degree by Spring of 2019;
  • Strong commitment to social justice and knowledge of reproductive justice, racial justice, drug policy reform and reform of the criminal legal and child welfare systems;
  • Demonstrated ability to conduct legal research, analysis and writing;
  • Self motivated with ability to take initiative and work independently;
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills, time management, and interpersonal skills; • Experience with client communication;
  • Ability to undertake occasional travel;
  • Advanced-level proficiency (within a Mac environment) in MS Office Suite and other software applications, social media platforms, and search engines (e.g. Zoom, Google Hangout, Skype, InstaGram,Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube); Familiarity with (or trainability in) a variety of database and project management applications (e.g. WestLaw, LexisNexis, 4D). 

To Apply:
Please submit the following (must include all items listed below):
1. Cover Letter that includes a few sentences about the fellowships to which you seek to apply;
2. Resumé;
3. One (1) Writing Sample;
4. Complete contact information for three (3) professional references.

Instructions:

  • NO PHONE CALLS OR FAXES PLEASE.
  • Application must be sent as one single PDF VIA EMAIL ONLY SEND TO: [email protected]
    SUBJECT: ATTN: Human Resources – Law Fellow (Fall 2019)
Post-Graduate Fellowship Sponsorship  

Full Time

SALARY

Details: Salary is commensurate with experience.

PUBLISHED

06/08/2018

ADDRESS

7 Hanover Square
18th Floor
New York
NY
10004
United States

DESCRIPTION

About NYLAG

Founded in 1990, the New York Legal Assistance Group provides free civil legal services to low-income New Yorkers. The organization serves immigrants, seniors, the homebound, families facing foreclosure, renters facing eviction, low-income consumers, those in need of government assistance, children in need of special education, domestic violence victims, persons with disabilities, patients with chronic illness or disease, low-wage workers, low-income members of the LGBTQ community, Holocaust survivors, and others in need. The organization’s annual operating budget is over $27 million. Serving more than 75,000 New Yorkers annually, New York Legal Assistance Group maintains a paid staff of approximately 280, supported by 2,200 pro bono attorneys and other volunteers and interns. For more information, applicants are encouraged to visit www.nylag.org.

Mission

The New York Legal Assistance Group uses the power of the law to help New Yorkers in need combat social and economic injustice. We address emerging and urgent legal needs with comprehensive, free civil legal services, impact litigation, policy advocacy, and community education.

Values that guide us

  • We reduce the effects of poverty by providing high quality, effective civil legal services. 
  • We partner with our clients to help them transform their lives and strengthen their communities.
  • We address our clients’ multiple legal needs by collaborating across our practice areas.
  • We are at the forefront of identifying and understanding New Yorkers’ most pressing legal needs, rapidly adapting to meet these needs with innovative programs and partnerships.
  • We assess need broadly, recognizing that need is not a function of income alone.
  • We collaborate with community organizations and engage pro bono attorneys and volunteers to serve a greater number of people with unmet civil legal needs.
  • We achieve systemic change through class actions, impact litigation and by advocating for just laws and policies.
  • We work to create a welcoming and inclusive work environment that reflects the communities we serve.
  • We teach and train the next generation of legal service professionals.

Job Description:

The New York Legal Assistance Group (NYLAG) seeks to sponsor third-year law students, judicial law clerks, and recent law graduates for public interest law fellowships, such as the Skadden and Equal Justice Works Fellowships, starting in the fall of 2019. NYLAG has an excellent track record of successful applicant sponsorship in a variety of areas of civil legal services law.
Examples of possible fellowship projects are listed below, but we will consider any project that fulfills NYLAG’s mission. Each project should include some combination of direct client services, community education, advocacy, and impact litigation. We strongly encourage those considering applying for fellowship sponsorship to reach out directly to staff in the Unit in which the project would be housed to discuss the viability of any potential project prior to submitting your applications for sponsorship. NYLAG staff will actively work with the selected candidates to more fully develop the fellowship proposal for submission.
The Elder Law Practice within the Public Benefits Unit seeks an elder justice legal fellow who will address the civil legal needs of victims of elder abuse. The project will include community outreach and education on how to stop elder abuse and direct legal services to enforce the legal rights of older adults. The fellow will provide screenings for indicia of abuse, neglect, or exploitation, and follow-up legal assistance to address current abuse and to preempt any future abuse. This unique position will allow a comprehensive response to the needs of elder abuse victims through regular participation in city-wide multidisciplinary teams of professionals, including government, nonprofit, and healthcare organizations and enhanced with geropsychiatrists and forensic accountants
The Evelyn Frank Legal Resources Program (EFLRP) seeks a fellow who is passionate about health care and/or the rights of seniors and people with disabilities. EFLRP advocates for access to health care for low-income people, focusing on seniors and people with disabilities who face challenges obtaining and keeping Medicaid long-term care services to remain in their homes and avoid nursing homes. EFLRP welcomes project proposals involving any aspect of its activities. Projects may include enforcement of consumer rights and due process protections as members of Medicaid managed care plans who must now exhaust plan-level appeals before seeking relief from a neutral administrative law judge, the transition of people who lose Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act when they become eligible for Medicare, and state compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act mandate that services be provided in the home, not in nursing homes. Though not required, EFLRP is especially interested in candidates fluent in a second language, and projects that target consumers with Limited English Proficiency.  Projects will be impacted by any replacement of or changes to the ACA and/or Medicaid.
The Immigrant Protection Unit (IPU) seeks a fellow interested in further expanding / developing a project providing free legal services, as well as community outreach, to low income members of New York’s LGBTQ community.  The fellowship would focus on immigration remedies, but could also include such issues as public benefits eligibility and employment assistance (through our collaborative effort with Madison Strategies). The Immigrants’ Rights Project would provide free legal services to LGBTQ clients in all kinds of immigration matters, including but not limited to asylum, U and T visas, and legal permanent residency and naturalization applications.
LegalHealth is seeking a fellow to start a Housing Part (HP) Project. Many clients have repair issues in their homes that are not being addressed regardless of whether they live in private apartments, rent stabilized apartments, or NYCHA. To address these conditions, tenants must bring an HP action in housing court. Bad housing conditions often impact health and go to the core of the medical-legal partnership mission. For example, mold throughout a home that is not treated can have an extremely adverse effect on the health of any resident but specifically with those who have asthma and other respiratory medical conditions. LegalHealth does not have the resources to represent clients in these actions, although the few times representation did occur, LegalHealth had great success. A Fellow would be responsible for starting an HP Project that would incorporate developing a pro bono component.
LegalHealth is also seeking a fellow to start an Article 81 Guardianship Project. Relatives or friends of incapacitated individuals come to NYLAG seeking guardianship for their loved ones in order to carryout financial or healthcare decisions. The individuals served through this project (petitioner and the alleged incapacitated person) would be low income. There are no free legal serves available to bring such actions. The fellow would, working with LegalHealth and NYLAG’s Total Life Choices Program, develop a project and incorporate a pro bono component.
The LGBTQ Law Project provides free legal services in a wide variety of civil legal matters impacting the LGBTQ community, including employment and housing discrimination, immigration, public benefits, name and gender marker changes, family law and life planning. Despite strong protections at both the local and state level, LGBTQ workers, particularly those who are transgender, non-binary or gender non-conforming, routinely face discrimination on the job. We are seeking a fellow to provide crucial representation to transgender, non-binary and gender non-conforming individuals in employment discrimination cases in New York City. In addition to litigating cases in all relevant forums, the fellow will also have the opportunity to provide public education and community outreach to further assist clients fighting back against workplace bias.
The Shelter Advocacy and Homeless Rights Initiative within the Public Benefits Unit will provide individual representation and advocacy for individuals and families navigating shelter admission, denial, and termination issues. The project will also incorporate outreach and education regarding the shelter system and available resources, including City and State subsidy eligibility, to help shelter residents secure more permanent housing. The fellow will work with the Special Litigation Unit to address systemic issues through impact litigation.
The Tenants’ Rights Unit and Special Litigation Unit seek fellows to bring affirmative litigation on behalf of vulnerable tenant populations in New York City, especially immigrants. The project will include tenant outreach, individual representation in court and/or administrative proceedings, and both individual and impact litigation to enforce tenants’ rights under the Rent Stabilization Code and other laws.
The Veterans Legal Assistance Project within the Public Benefits Unit seeks a legal fellow to provide direct legal representation, counsel and advice and community outreach to low-income and homeless veterans and military dependents in New York City. The goal of the fellowship is to connect with veterans in the community to address the legal problems that arise during and after military service that often stem from physical, mental and moral injuries sustained during service. The fellowship will emphasize a holistic approach to service veterans by assisting veterans with income maintenance issues and homelessness prevention. The fellow will assist clients with accessing VA benefits such as disability compensation and healthcare, eviction defense and tenant’s rights, reentry issues, employment and housing discrimination, and a host of other legal issues
Please indicate in your cover letter whether you are interested in any of the above projects or if there is a different project that you would like to develop. We will ask for writing samples and references before interviewing. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, with those submitted by July 6, 2018 having priority. You may use the following email address for any questions: [email protected].

Duties and Responsibilities:

See above.

Qualifications:

Applicants must be rising third-year law students or recent law school graduates eligible for the fellowship programs for which they seek NYLAG sponsorship. Please consult the fellowship program websites for information on eligibility.

NYLAG’s Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion

NYLAG is proud to be an equal opportunity employer. People of color, women, people with disabilities, immigrants, veterans, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people, and those with lived experiences in the communities we serve are strongly encouraged to apply.

BENEFITS

Excellent benefits.

PROFESSIONAL LEVEL

Professional

MINIMUM EDUCATION REQUIRED

Other 

Office of the Inspector General for the NYC Police Department
Law Internship & Fellowship Program

 

The Office of the Inspector General for the NYPD (OIG-NYPD) is an independent office charged with investigating, reviewing, studying, auditing, and making recommendations relating to the operations, policies, programs, and practices of the New York City Police Department, with the goal of enhancing the effectiveness of NYPD, increasing public safety, protecting civil liberties and civil rights, and increasing the public’s confidence in the police force. OIG-NYPD is independent of the NYPD and is part of the New York City Department of Investigation (DOI). For more information, visit www.nyc.gov/html/oignypd.

OIG-NYPD is seeking energetic law student Interns and/or post-graduate legal fellows to assist OIG- NYPD attorneys and investigators in a wide range of legal and investigative projects. The positions offer an opportunity to work on cutting-edge issues of public concern in a, high-profile environment. Interns/Fellows will examine legal topics relating to active reviews and investigations of NYPD policies and practices, research and draft legal documents, summarize pertinent case law and legislation, support OIG-NYPD operations, review investigative material, assist with inquiries received by OIG- NYPD, participate in internal staff meetings and external meetings with key stakeholders, and help develop strategies and policies. The positions are unpaid.

The selected candidate should be enthusiastic about working in government and on police accountability, law enforcement, civil rights, and criminal justice issues. Candidates should demonstrate good judgment, high ethical standards, strong analytical and writing skills, and a proactive attitude. All candidates are required to successfully complete a criminal background check.

To apply, please submit a resume, letter of interest, and a short (5-10 page) legal writing sample via email or postal service to the address below. Writing samples that contain legal arguments and analysis are preferred over general research papers or legal journal articles/notes.

Asim Rehman
Deputy Inspector General
Office of Inspector General for the NYPD
NYC Department of Investigation
80 Maiden Lane
New York, NY 10038
[email protected] (Subject Line: Law Internship/Fellowship Fall 2018)

Applicants participating in a formal internship, fellowship, or externship program through their graduate school should specify the duration of the program and the number of weekly hours they will be available and/or required to work, and include the necessary supervisory procedures for obtaining course credit from their schools. Candidates will be required to work a minimum of 15 hours per week from September through December.

In addition to internships with the Inspector General for the NYPD, the NYC Department of Investigation offers internships with Inspector Generals of other NYC agencies as well as with DOI’s General Counsel unit and other internal functions. To apply for one of these DOI internships, please visit http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doi/about/internships.page.

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis and the posting will close once the position is filled. Questions may be directed to the email address above.

 Sanctuary for Families
Equal Justice Works Crime Victims Justice Corps Legal Fellowship Program
ABOUT US

Sanctuary for Families is New York’s leading service provider and advocate for survivors of domestic violence, sex trafficking and related forms of gender violence. Every year, Sanctuary empowers thousands of adults and children to move from fear and abuse to safety and stability, transforming lives through a comprehensive range of services. We provide a range of wrap-around services to help survivors rebuild their lives in the aftermath of abuse, and work to end gender violence through three
key strategies: direct services, outreach and training, and systems-change advocacy. Our services are available in 19 locations throughout New York City.

POSITION OVERVIEW

The Equal Justice Works Crime Victims Justice Corps (EJW-CVJC) is a legal fellowship program designed to increase capacity and access to civil legal help for crime victims. A cohort of approximately sixty fellows are placed at nonprofit organizations across the country to provide direct representation to victims of crimes, including human trafficking, fraud/identity theft, campus sexual assault, and hate crime, and immigrant victims of crime with meritorious claims for immigration relief, and outreach and education to community partners. All fellows will incorporate crime victims’ rights enforcement into their practice and will receive training from the National Crime Victim Law Institute and other training and technical assistance partners.

This program is supported by an award from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime, Award Number 2017-MU-MU-K131, and private funding. The fellow will be supervised by Sanctuary for Families and based in our Manhattan Office. The EJW-CVJC Fellow will provide legal representation, advocacy and screenings for human
trafficking victims. The Fellow will conduct trainings and community outreaches and collaborate with other agencies to advocate for systematic change.

TO APPLY:  Please select the link: https://careers-sanctuaryforfamilies.icims.com/jobs/1323/case-
manager%2c-anti-trafficking-initiative/job

Download a full description here.


Legal Momentum Announces New Gender Justice Fellowship

Help lead the fight for equal rights for all women and girls.

Every day, the news highlights the unprecedented challenges facing women and girls in the 21st century. From old-fashioned “locker-room talk” to the latest digital platforms, women and girls are subject to violence, harassment, and discrimination.

Legal Momentum has been leading the way to eliminate gender bias by helping women access justice for nearly 50 years. Now, Legal Momentum has established a new, two-year Gender Justice Fellowship to continue its mission to transform our society into one where all women and girls are economically secure, empowered to make their own choices, and live and work free of discrimination and violence.

The Gender Justice Fellow will work with grassroots organizations, the media, government entities, labor unions, and advocacy organizations to advance Legal Momentum’s mission of gender equality, with a strategic focus on parity in the workplace. The Fellow will serve as an ambassador for our work among girls and younger women. Professionals from diverse disciplines, including education, law, media, and technology, with at least two years of social justice-related experience and demonstrated commitment to women’s rights, human rights, and civil rights are encouraged to apply.

Click here for a full job description and application instructions.

The 2017-2018 Gender Justice Fellowship is generously funded by a Cy Pres award recommended by Mehri & Skalet, PLLC, and Moody & Warner P.C. 

Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellowship
 
In partnership with the Fred T. Korematsu Institute, NLF will be accepting applications for the Fred T. Korematsu Summer Fellowship Program. The program will provide $6,000 for a meaningful summer internship at a public interest organization. The intern will work to further Fred T. Korematsu's legacy as a civil rights pioneer. Initial funding was provided by Parkin Lee and The Rockefeller Group. For more information and to apply, click HERE.